Friday, December 4, 2015

Street Lamp QRM?



After many months with severe buzzing on the HF bands in the evenings it looks like there is a promising lead finally. 


The buzzing has been S6 to S9 with the worst being 40m.  It has been especially maddening as sometimes it would randomly stop and the clarity would be amazing.


But what was causing this?  Power lines someplace seemed like a culprit, but where?  Driving around trying to find noise peaks from the mobile wasn't to help as the antenna on the car just wasn't as sensitive as the big antennas at the house and the ignition noise was just as strong as the noise being hunted.


A friend then mentioned how he was having bad noise and found it to be the street lamps on his road.  That after getting the power company to service the lights the bands were once again quiet for him.


So what is up with the lights?  Apparently it is normal during turn on of those popular yellow/orange street lamps for them to make RF noise that lasts a short bit (20 or 40 seconds).


When these lights start to go bad they can sit in a perpetual turning-on state.  They can turn on and as soon as fully on  immediately turn off and then start turning on again.  Or they can sit in a half turned on state.  When neither fully off nor on fully on they make RF noise.


A few days later while listening to 20M in the afternoon with the band sounding clear, the buzzing suddenly started.  A quick look out the window shows it was starting to get dark out.  The street lamp in front of the house was still out but it was that time of day street lights would be turning on.  After 20 seconds or so the buzzing stopped.  Was that a street lamp turning on?  Not sure, none within view of the house are on.  The buzzing starts again, a quick look out the front window and the street lamp in front of the house is just starting to turn on.  Shortly thereafter the buzzing stops, another look at the street lamp and it looks fully on.


Back to the radio, more buzzing starts but is fainter, perhaps a lamp further away?  More listening and the pattern keeps repeating, sometimes stronger, sometime weaker, sometimes overlapping.  But it is a buzzing that occurs for a 10s of seconds and then goes away.  Yes it makes sense, it is the different street lamps coming on in the area. 


Eventually a buzz picks up and doesn't go away expect for the occasional few seconds.  Perhaps this is a faulty light?  It is now dark out, all lights should be on.  The street lamps that can see from the house are all fully on, but are there any in the area not working right?  Its time for a drive.


During a drive around the neighborhood reveals three street lamps stuck in a half on condition, one turning off every time it turns on and two completely off.  A total of 6 faulty lights within a mile.  One of the ones completely off is behind the house and if that is making noise that could be the biggest culprit.


With the pole number recorded for the problem lights and reported to the electric company now we just need to see how long it takes for them to get fixed and see if this resolves the nighttime buzz. 


Keeping our fingers crossed on this one. 
K2EZ

Monday, November 30, 2015

SARL Digital Contest: 1300Z-1600Z, Dec 6


Mode: PSK, RTTY
Bands: 80, 40, 20m
Classes: (none)
Exchange: RST + QSO No.
Work stations: Once per mode per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: (see rules)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: December 13, 2015
E-mail logs to: contest[at]sarl[dot]org[dot]za
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.sarl.org.za/Document_Store/CONT_20150101_SARL_Contest_Manual_2015.pdf

Ten-Meter RTTY Contest: 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 6


Mode: RTTY
Bands: 10m Only
Classes: Single Op
Multi-Op
Max power: 100 watts
Exchange: W: RST + state
VE: RST + province/territory
non-W/VE: RST + Serial No.
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: Each US state (excluding KH6/KL7) and DC once
Each VE province/territory once
Each DXCC country (excluding W/VE)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 2359Z December 15, 2015
E-mail logs to: ten-rtty[at]kkn[dot]net
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.rttycontesting.com/ten-meter-rtty-contest/rules/

AB1OC Speaks at BARS - W1HH.org

Time 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Matthews Memorial Church in Chelmsford

Full detail at http://www.w1hh.org/?p=974
The next meeting of the Billerica Amateur Radio Society (BARS) is Wednesday, December 2, 2015.

Meeting Time: 7:00-9:30 PM

Topic: Installation and Operation of a Mobile HF Station

Our Guest speaker: Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC, will talk about “Installation and Operation of a Mobile HF Station”. This is another talk that fits well with our BARS “Get-on-the-air” project. Fred has put together a very informative talk.
This presentation covers the steps involved in installing a mobile HF setup and getting it to operate well in a modern vehicle. The presentation covers the construction and operation of a state of the art mobile HF station in three steps/levels ­ a basic 100W setup with HAM Stick antennas, installation of a Screwdriver antenna to cover all HF bands 160m ­ 10m, and finally the addition of an amplifier for higher power operation. Operational results at each level as well as tips and areas to focus on are covered. As an added bonus, he will have a mobile station at the meeting for viewing.

The weekly BARS 8 PM Wednesday night net will not meet because of the club meeting. Instead, members are encouraged to get on Billerica (147.12) on their way to/from the meeting.


Saturday, November 14, 2015

what kind of antenna is this?

please help me determine what kind of HF beam antenna is this?


please email me or just comment here in my blog as to what kind of HF beam antenna this is!

thanx you so much

73

Friday, October 30, 2015

NRAU 10m Activity Contest: 1800Z-1900Z, Nov 5 (CW) and 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 5 (SSB) and 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 5 (FM) and 2100Z-2200Z, Nov 5 (Dig)




Mode: CW, SSB, FM, Digital
Bands: 10m Only



Classes: (none)
Exchange: RS(T) + 6-character grid square
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: November 19, 2015
Upload log at: http://ua9qcq.com/en/submit_log.php?lang=en
Mail logs to: (none)


Find rules at: http://www.nrau.net/activity-contests/below-30mhz.html



NRAU 10m Activity Contest: 1800Z-1900Z, Nov 5 (CW) and 1900Z-2000Z, Nov 5 (SSB) and 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 5 (FM) and 2100Z-2200Z, Nov 5 (Dig)

Saturday, October 24, 2015

10-10 FALL DIGITAL QSO party 11/14 00:00 THRU 11/15 23:59

I REALLY HOPE THE 10-10 FALL DIGITAL QSO PARTY 28MHZ is as good as it was for cq ww dx ssb!

Sat Nov 14, 2015 00:00 -
Sun Nov 15, 2015 23:59
10-10 Fall Digital QSO Party



10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital: 0001Z, Nov 14 to 2359Z, Nov 15
Mode: Digital
Bands: 10m Only
Classes: Individual
Club
QRP
Max power: non-QRP: >5 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: 10-10 Member: Name + 10-10 number + (state/province/country)
Non-Member: Name + 0 + (state/province/country)
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with a non-member
2 points per QSO with a 10-10 member
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: November 30, 2015
E-mail logs to: tentencontest[at]ten-ten[dot]org
Mail logs to: Dan Morris, KZ3T
3162 Covington Way
Lenoir, NC 28645
USA
Find rules at: http://www.ten-ten.org/index.php/activity/2013-07-22-20-26-48/qso-party-rules

I WILL BE THERE....

28 mhz open today... it is the top line with all the red dots.....

28 MHZ IS WIDE OPEN ......... THANK YOU GOD

AND DURING A CONTEST... WE ARE SO SO SO LUCKY


Friday, October 23, 2015

goal for all hams in next 12 months - recruit/elmer 1 youth

I challenge each and every ham in the next 12 months to recruit/elmer 1 youth.

here are some suggestions to recruit 1 young person Male or Female:
In order to work with people you can get a local temple,church, hall to do this task

1. work with boy scouts
2. work with girl scouts
3. work with your local grade/junior/high school
4. work with a youth center
4. work with your local YMCA
5. put in paper about teaching some youths ( ages )21 and under
6. do an online recruitment to teach
7. talk to parents first
8. setup a station in a very public location (take note of interested young people)


if you have any other ideas/suggestions please add them here.. or send me email

ka1uln1@gmail.com

CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB: 0000Z, Oct 24 to 2400Z, Oct 25

Mode: SSB
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (QRP/Low/High)(Option: Classic/Rookie)

Single Op Single Band (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Assisted All Band (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Assisted Single Band (QRP/Low/High)
Multi-Single
Multi-Two
Multi-Multi
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: RS + CQ Zone No.
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 0 points per QSO with same country (counts as mult)
1 point per QSO with different country same continent
2 points per QSO with different country same continent (NA)
3 points per QSO with different continent
Multipliers: Each CQ zone once per band
Each country once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 2359Z October 30, 2015
E-mail logs to: ssb[at]cqww[dot]com
Upload log at: http://www.cqww.com/logcheck/
Web-to-Cabrillo form: http://www.b4h.net/cabforms/cqwwssb_cab.php
Mail logs to: CQWW DX Contest
Box 481
New Carlisle, OH 45344
USA
Find rules at: http://www.cqww.com/rules.htm

Thursday, September 3, 2015

What is in your GO KIT?


http://www.arrl.org/files/file/A​RESFieldResourcesManual.pdf

http://www.qsl.net/kc0nrk/go-bag​s.html


University of Pittsburgh has an online disaster preparedness https://www.coursera.org/learn/d​isaster-preparedness


candles, medicine, flashlight, paper , pen

what else do you have?


Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Elmer ? It is your time to Elmer someone

Have YOU ever thought of Elmering?

you can go to boy scout / girl scout meeting and give a talk or just present to the
scout amateur radio. very easy. and speak up and tell them we could start radio
classes to get your TECH license.

start a tech class

point them to the arrl.org/youth

point them to ylrl.org/youth

setup a station in park (you will attract attention)

make flyers to share your knowledge

speak in your complex where you live.

speak to other seniors to get their grandchildren interested.

for more ideas check out arrl.org/youth or ylrl.org/youth

73 Niece

Billerica Amateur Radio Club New meeting location as of September 2, 2015


Here is some advance info on our upcoming Bars meeting. Help us spread the word.

The topic is called: "Less is More".
The speaker is Carl Achin, WA1ZCQ from the NE QRP Club.

From the w1hh webpage:
The Billerica Amateur Radio Society resumes its meetings on Wednesday, September 2, 2015 following our summer hiatus.
We have secured a new meeting location and invite everyone to join us for the first meeting to be held at:

Matthews Memorial Church
128 Gorham St. (Route 3A)
East Chelmsford, MA 01824

Meeting Time: 7:00-9:30 PM

We have a great speaker and topic lined up, so check back soon as full details and directions will be posted soon.

Tom K1TW




the 147.12 repeater is back up and running strong... join us there...

Friday, August 21, 2015

The ARRL New England Convention at the Holiday Inn in Boxborough, Massachusetts

here is the Boxboro link... www.BOXBORO.ORG

August 21-22-23, 2015
View the convention "Ticker" Live!
Tickets available at the Door!
General Admission $15
Flea Space $10 (requires one general admission per person)
A limited number of banquet seats will be available in the hotel lobby only
Friday $35 Saturday $40


See the Convention Schedule
Includes flea & exhibit hall hours as well as forums
Updated 8/19/2015

Hotel Info Directions


CONVENTION PRIZES:
Every paid admission attendee is entered to win
in our Sunday grand drawing
You do not need to be present to win
Grand Prize: Kenwood TS-2000 Transceiver
First Prize: Icom IC-7100 Transceiver
Second Prize: Yaesu FTM400DR Transceiver
Second Prize: Yaesu FT2DR Transceiver
Third Prize: Yaesu FTM100DR Transceiver


W1A Special Event Station Reserve your operating slot

NEQRP at Boxboro and W1B Special Event Station

NEQRP Build-a-Thon

New Express Flea Entry for 2015 VE Exam Schedule



YL and Teen SSB contest 8/23


CVA DX Contest, SSB: 2100Z, Aug 22 to 2100Z, Aug 23
Mode: SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Single Band (Low/High)
Multi-Single (Low/High)
Multi-Two
Headquarters
Teen Single Op
YL Single Op
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: RS + type/UF(see rules)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: Each UF once per band
Each country once only
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 15, 2015
E-mail logs to: ssb[at]craec[dot]org
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.craec.org


Hawaii QSO party: 0400Z, Aug 22 to 0400Z, Aug 24


Hawaii QSO Party: 0400Z, Aug 22 to 0400Z, Aug 24
Mode: CW, Phone, RTTY, PSK
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op Mixed (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Technician CW+SSB (200W)
Single Op CW (Low/High)
Single Op Digital High Power
Multi-Single
Multi-Multi
Max operating hours: Single Op: 18
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 150 watts
QRP: 5 watts CW/RTTY/PSK, 10 watts SSB
Exchange: HI: RS(T) + QTH ID
non-HI W/VE: RS(T) + (state/province)
DX: RS(T)
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: HI: Each HI QTH ID once
HI: Each state/province/territory/country once
non-HI: Each HI QTH ID once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 30, 2015
E-mail logs to: awards[at]hawaiiqsoparty[dot]org
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.hiqsoparty.org/Rules/HQP/HQPRules.html

Thursday, August 13, 2015

10 meters open tonight at 02:00 utc 10 pm est

made a contact from massachusetts to West Virginia

which is normally difficult even when 10 meters is up...

just get on 10 meters and try it.. Ya never know.

88

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

ten-ten.org contest 8/1/15 SSB 0001Z

Summer Phone QSO Party
From Saturday 01 August 2015 To Sunday 02 August 2015

Location : 10 Meters

EXCHANGE = 10-10 Member: Name + 10-10 number + (state/province/country)
Non-Member: Name + 0 + (state/province/country)

Contact : Dan Morris KZ3T

Logs must be postmarked NLT August 17, 2015

tentencontest@ten-ten.org
dbmorris315@gmail.com (Alternate)

Upload logs at the KJ4IZW if possible, otherwise email logs to either of above addresses.

let's do this YL's I(KA1ULN) challenge all YL's

QST - YL on front cover KM4HFY


This is wonderful that a YL is on the front cover of QST.

KM4HFY = Megan Brown via W4MSA - Martha Muir

send W4MSA email congratulating Megan and Martha

Let's get more YL's on the front cover of QST.

QRV - we are ready

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

7/21/15 www.w5kub.com


Every Tuesday night a live Ham Radio and shortwave program on W5KUB.COM at 8 PM CT (0100 UTC Wed). this show is also simulcast on powerful 100 KW shortwave station WTWW on 5085 Khz. Chat room and phone lines will be open. Guest this week is John Cunningham W1AI talking about Ham it Forward. Next week we have Riley Hollingsworth, retired, in charge of FCC Amateur radio enforcement division.
Tom Medlin's photo.


WWW.W5KUB.COM

73/33 ka1uln

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

PSK MACROS - sharing, examples, questions and help with macros


Post your psk macros here.

CQ what macro do you use to call cq?

answer what macro do you use to answer a station calling cq?

again what macro do you use to ask to repeat anything?

report what macro to you use to give your report?

I am hoping to collect many macros from many hams from all over the world.
let's see how we use them and maybe we can share.

33/73

Friday, June 26, 2015

EME net


for those of you just getting interested in EME - Moonbounce operation,
there is a net operation every weekend where you can obtain additional
information or make schedules. The net starts aprox 1500 GMT on 14.345 Mhz
with 432 and above EME. It is followed by the 2 mtr EME net at aprox 1600/1700 GMT.
EME scheduling from the nets is done with the SKD program. SKD is freeware
developed by W9HLY, N1BUG and AF9Y. Here's the latest version: skd87a.zip (181K Bytes)

The data files for SKD87a are updated every Monday Evening by Brian Manns, W3EME.
You can contact him at w3eme@mtwirefree.net for automatic emailing each week or
you can download it here: vhfsched.skd (aprox 90K Bytes)

taken from af9y.com

Thursday, June 25, 2015

10-10 Int. Spirit of 76 QSO Party: 0001Z, Jun 29 to 2400Z, Jul 5


Mode: CW, SSB, PSK31, RTTY, FM, AM
Bands: 10m Only
Classes: Individual Club QRP
Max power: non-QRP: >5 watts QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: 10-10 Member: Name + 10-10 number + (state/province/country)
Non-Member: Name + 0 + (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per mode
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with a non-member
2 points per QSO with a 10-10 member
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: July 20, 2015
E-mail logs to: tentencontest[at]ten-ten[dot]org
Mail logs to: Dan Morris, KZ3T
3162 Covington Way
Lenoir, NC 28645
USA
Find rules at: http://www.ten-ten.org/Forms/Spirit.pdf

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

YLRL GRANDMOTHER and GREAT-GRANDMOTHER AWARD - do it for field day


YLRL Grandmother and Great-Grandmother Awards
This is a certificate that did not originate with the YLRL. It was started by Mary Meyer W9RUKJ (SK) in 1958 as a way to get more YLs involved in having fun on the radio. By just chatting with other YLs you could enjoy the hobby more, and at the same time work towards a nice certificate to hang on the wall in your shack.

After Mary became a silent key, the award was run by Martha Shirley W0ZWL until she became a silent key. After that Phyllis Douglas K7SEC oversaw the award until recently.

I was not aware of this award at all until a member of YLRL applied for a YLRL certificate and mentioned she would like to apply for the Grandmother Award but didn't know the procedure. I discussed it with the YLRL officers and they directed me to Phyllis who had not had any applicants for the award for some time. I don't remember if it was Phyllis or a YLRL officer suggested to me that we take it on as a YLRL certification, but I was in favor of it, so they put me in contact with Phyllis who was also in favor of it becoming a YLRL certificate. After that Phyllis sent me everything she had on the award along with a brief history of the award.

I was pleased to see that the original was not only for grandmothers but had a seal for great-grandmothers. While reading over the original rules, I realized that instead of a seal we could jut have two certificates---one for collecting names of grandmothers and one for collecting names of great-grandmothers. I did keep it as a stacked award though--in otherwards, you have to receive the grandmother's certificate first and then work on the great-grandmother's certificate. You can't do it the other way around. I've kept the rules very close to what were the original rules.

There is no list of grandmothers or great-grandmothers for you to contact. You have to find them by simply making contacts on the radio and chatting. We all know how to do that. Look for anyone who is a grandmother and log their information as listed in the rules below.







YLRL GRANDMOTHER AWARD
1
. Available to all licensed amateur radio operators (YLs and OMs).
2. Have QSOs with 15 grandmothers and collect the following information for each --Date of QSO, Time, band, call-sign, name and number of grandchildren.
3. Great-grandchildren DO NOT count for this award (you will understand why later).
4. "Grandchildren" refer to children of your children. Your children and grandchildren can be related biologically, adopted, foster and step children and/or grandchildren. They cannot be the neighbor's children who call you grandma and are not related in any way.
5. Send your log to the YLRL Certificate Manager either by e-mail, or snail mail to receive your certificate. The certificate will be returned by the same method used to send the log, unless you specify a different method.
6. After receiving your Grandmother Award Certificate, you can continue to the next award.
7. If you mail your log in or want a certificate mailed to you, please enclose at least 4 first class US postage stamps. If you live in a DX country and cannot get US stamps, the stamps are not necessary.





YLRL GREAT-GRANDMOTHER AWARD
1. Before you can work on this award you must first complete the GRANDMOTHER AWARD above.
2. Available to all licensed amateur radio operators (YLs and OMs).
3. Have WSOs with 15 great-grandmothers and collect the following information for each--Date of QSO, Time, band, call-sign, name and number of great-grandchildren.
4. "Great-Grandchildren" refer to the children of your children's children. Your children, grandchildren and/or great-grandchildren can be related biologically, adopted, foster and step at any level.
5. Send your log to the YLRL Certificate manager either by e-mail or snail mail to receive your certificate. the certificate will be returned by the same method used to send the log, unless you specify a different method.
6. If you mail your log in or want a certificate mailed to you, please enclose at least 4 first class US postage stamps. If you live in a DX country and cannot get US stamps, the stamps are not necessary.

See YLRL Certificates for the BASIC RULES for all Certificates.



Sunday, June 21, 2015

Amateur Radio License.... NOW IS THE TIME TO GET YOURS. easy as ever


here are a few links to get your Amateur Radio License: http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Ham_Radio/Exams/


also google your local Radio club

Good Luck and see ya on the Bands

Saturday, June 20, 2015

WSPR update 6/20/15

So I CAN confirm I am transmitting out with my rigblaster and CI-V on my Icom IC-761.
here is proof


this is a 20 meter wspr session
normally i am on 30 meters.

come on and join me.. it is a great mode to test your environment

33/73

Thursday, June 18, 2015

QRN on 10m from Over The Horizon Radar


QRN on 10m from Over The Horizon Radar

All 10 meter operators must have noticed the whistle type two-tone noise signals created by radar operating over horizon on the amateur radio 10 meter band whenever the band is open. This noise of radar over the horizon is now for more than FOUR years The intensity of the noise is very high from 28490 kHz up to band edge. This noise always disturbs DXing on this band.

The location of the radar is either in Singapore or Iran??

As I am a fan of 10 meters, many friends from ON, OZ, LA & G/M ask about this noise.

I request all the 10 M FANS (hams) who are aware of this noise to write complain to IARU/ Monitoring stations in their country. I request Amateur Radio Clubs around the world to take this matter to the appropriate authority on behalf of all.

Regards to all. 73.

Datta, VU2DSI


Wednesday, June 17, 2015

June contest 17-21


CWops Mini-CWT Test: 1300Z-1400Z, Jun 17 and 1900Z-2000Z, Jun 17 and 0300Z-0400Z, Jun 18
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: Member: Name + Member No.
non-Member: Name + (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: Each call once
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 0400Z June 20, 2015
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.cwops.org/cwt.html

NAQCC CW Sprint: 0030Z-0230Z, Jun 18
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 20m
Classes: (none)
Max power: 999 mW
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with non-member
2 points per QSO with member
Multipliers: Each state, province, or country once
Key Type Mult: 2x if straight key, 1.5x if bug, 1x if other
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults x key type mult
Submit logs by: 2359Z June 21, 2015
Upload log at: http://naqcc.info/sprintlog.html
Mail logs to: John Shannon, K3WWP
478 E. High St.
Kittanning, PA 16201
USA
Find rules at: http://naqcc.info/sprint201506mw.html

RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB: 1900Z-2030Z, Jun 18
Mode: SSB
Bands: 80m Only
Classes: (none)
Exchange: RS + Serial No.
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: (see rules)
Submit logs by: 2359Z June 25, 2015
Upload log at: http://www.vhfcc.org/cgi-bin/hfenter.pl
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.rsgbcc.org/hf/rules/2015/r80mcc.shtml

NCCC RTTY Sprint: 0145Z-0215Z, Jun 19
Mode: RTTY
Bands: (see rules)
Classes: (none)
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: June 21, 2015
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rttyns.html

NCCC Sprint Ladder: 0230Z-0300Z, Jun 19
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Single Op
Max power: 100 watts
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: NA station: 1 point per QSO
non-NA station: 1 point per QSO with an NA station
Multipliers: Each US state (including KL7 and KH6) once per band
Each VE province once per band
Each North American country (except W/VE) once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: June 21, 2015
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rules.html

All Asian DX Contest, CW: 0000Z, Jun 20 to 2400Z, Jun 21
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Asian Single Op Single Band (High/Low)
Non-Asian Single Op Single Band (High)
JA Single Op Multi Band (High/Low/Junior/Silver)
Asian Single Op Multi Band (High/Low)
Non-Asian Single Op Multi Band (High)
Multi-Single
Multi-Multi
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
Exchange: RST + 2-digit age
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: Asian Stations: DXCC entities once per band
non-Asian Stations: Asian prefixes once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: July 22, 2015
E-mail logs to: aacw[at]jarl[dot]org
Web-to-Cabrillo form: http://www.b4h.net/cabforms/aadxcw_cab3.php
Mail logs to: JARL, All Asian DX Contest, CW
170-8073
Japan
Find rules at: https://www.jarl.org/English/4_Library/A-4-3_Contests/2015AA_rule.htm

SMIRK Contest: 0000Z, Jun 20 to 2400Z, Jun 21
Mode: CW, Phone
Bands: 6m Only
Classes: Single Op
Exchange: SMIRK No. (optional) + 4-character grid square
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with non-member
2 points per QSO with SMIRK member
Multipliers: Each grid square
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: August 15, 2015
E-mail logs to: mickpdm[at]hotmail[dot]com
Mail logs to: Paul McBride, W3FJ
10 Longview Dr.
Williamsport, PA 17701
USA
Find rules at: http://www.smirk.org/contest.html

Ukrainian DX Classic RTTY Contest: 1200Z, Jun 20 to 1159Z, Jun 21
Mode: RTTY
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (Low/High)
Single Op All Band 6-Hour
Single Op Single Band
Multi-Single
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
Exchange: Ukraine: RST + 2-letter oblast
non-Ukraine: RST + Serial No.
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with same country
2 points per QSO with different country, same continent
3 points per QSO with different continent
non-UR Stations: 10 points per QSO with Ukraine
Multipliers: UR Stations: each DXCC/WAE country once per band
non-UR Stations: each DXCC/WAE country once per band
non-UR Stations: each Ukraine oblast once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: July 6, 2015
E-mail logs to: urdxcrtty[at]ukr[dot]net
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://urdxc.org/rtty/rules.php?english

AGCW VHF/UHF Contest: 1400Z-1700Z, Jun 20 (144) and 1700Z-1800Z, Jun 20 (432)
Mode: CW
Bands: 144 MHz, 432 MHz
Classes: Single Op
Max operating hours: 3 hours: 144 MHz
2 hours: 432 MHz
Max power: A: 5W
B: 5-50W
C: >50W
Exchange: RST + "/" + Serial No. + "/" Power class + "/" + 6-character grid locator
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per km per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: July 6, 2015
E-mail logs to: vhf-uhf[at]agcw[dot]de
Mail logs to: Manfred Busch, DK7ZH
Ebachstr. 13
D-35716 Dietzhoelztal-Mandeln
Germany
Find rules at: http://www.agcw.org/index.php/en/contests-and-cw-activities/vhf-uhf-contest

IARU Region 1 50 MHz Contest: 1400Z, Jun 20 to 1400Z, Jun 21
Mode: CW, SSB
Bands: 6m Only
Classes: Single Op
Exchange: RS(T) + QSO No. + locator
QSO Points: 1 point per km
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: July 5, 2015
E-mail logs to: (see your national society rules)
Mail logs to: (see your national society rules)
Find rules at: http://concours.r-e-f.org/reglements/actuels/reg_iaru50_fr_201303.pdf

Stew Perry Topband Challenge: 1500Z, Jun 20 to 1500Z, Jun 21
Mode: CW
Bands: 160m Only
Classes: Single Op
Multi-Op
Max operating hours: 14 hours
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 5-100 watts
QRP: <5 watts Exchange: 4-Character grid square QSO Points: 1 point per QSO plus 1 point per 500 km multiply QSO points by 2 if low power station multiply QSO points by 4 if QRP station Multipliers: Low power: x1.5 QRP: x3 Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x power multiplier Submit logs by: July 6, 2015 E-mail logs to: tbdc[at]contesting[dot]com Mail logs to: BARC 15125 SE Bartell Rd Boring, OR 97009 USA Find rules at: http://www.kkn.net/stew/ West Virginia QSO Party: 1600Z, Jun 20 to 0200Z, Jun 21 Mode: CW, SSB, Digital Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m Classes: Single Op (Fixed)(CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High) Multi-Multi (Fixed)(CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High) Mobile (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High) Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts CW, 10 watts phone
Exchange: WV: RS(T) + county
non-WV: RS(T) + (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: 2 points per SSB QSO with WV mobile
3 points per CW QSO with WV mobile
1 point per SSB QSO with fixed
2 points per CW QSO with fixed
Bonus: 100 points per QSO with W8WVA
WV Mobile Bonus: 100 points for each county activated
Multipliers: WV Stations: Each WV county once per band
WV Stations: Each state, VE province, DXCC country once
non-WV Stations: Each WV county once
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + bonus points
Submit logs by: July 6, 2015
E-mail logs to: wvqplogs[at]gmail[dot]com
Mail logs to: Jeffrey Woods, N8NH
714 Fayette Street
Princeton, WV 24740
USA
Find rules at: http://www.qsl.net/wvsarc/wvqp/2015wvqsorules.html

Feld Hell Sprint: 2000Z-2159Z, Jun 20
Mode: Feld Hell
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Mobile
Portable
Emergency Power
Commercial Power
SWL
Max power: Standard: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: (see rules)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Bonus Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: (see rules)
Score Calculation: (see rules)
Submit logs by: June 27, 2015
Upload log at: https://sites.google.com/site/feldhellclub/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: https://sites.google.com/site/feldhellclub/Home/contests/sprints/field-day-sprint

WAB 50 MHz Phone: 0900Z-1500Z, Jun 21
Mode: SSB
Bands: 6m Only
Classes: Single Op (Fixed/Mobile/Portable)
Multi-Op (Fixed/Mobile/Portable)
QRP
SWL (Fixed/Mobile/Portable)
Max power: non-QRP: >10 watts
QRP: 10 watts
Exchange: British Isles: RS + serial no. + WAB square
Other: RS + serial no. + country
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: (see rules)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: July 12, 2015
E-mail logs to: g3xkt[at]worked-all-britain[dot]org[dot]uk
Mail logs to: Tony Beardsley, G3XKT
14 York Avenue
Sandiacre, Nottingham NG10 5HB
United Kingdom
Find rules at: http://wab.intermip.net/Contest%20Rules.php#OtherRules

Kid's Day Contest: 1800Z-2359Z, Jun 21
Mode: SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 17, 15, 12, 10, 2m repeaters
Classes: (none)
Exchange: name + age + QTH + favorite color
Submit logs by: July 21, 2015
E-mail logs to: (none)
Mail logs to: (see rules)
Find rules at: http://www.arrl.org/kids-day

Run for the Bacon QRP Contest: 0100Z-0300Z, Jun 22
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Band
All Band
Max power: 5 watts
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + (Member No./power)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with non-member
3 points per QSO with member on same continent
5 points per QSO with member on different continent
Multipliers: Each state, province, or country once
Multiply mults by 2 if >50 members worked
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: June 28, 2015
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://fpqrp.org/pigrun/autolog.php
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://fpqrp.org/pigrun/


taken from wa7bmn

Thursday, June 11, 2015

YL - M0HZT net 7.175 BYLARA net


Wednesday, Jenni M0HZT is starting new nets on 40m on 7.175 +/- QRM

from 07.00 – 0900, 11.00 – 13.00 and 20.00 – 2200, using callsign M0BYL

Saturday, June 6, 2015

How to build a 10 meter dipole VIDEO


I found a great video which guides you through making a 10 meter dipole.
it really is excellent... easy to understand. and easy to do..

here is the link to the video:how to build a 10 meter dipole


if you like it please let me know....
if you hate it and know of a better one please let me know via the comments
just below this post.

thank you so much

Raspberry Pi and Amateur Radio (Apps and more)


have a raspberry Pi or want a raspberry PI?

this is the best thing going for now. it is a full blown computer on a 2x2 board
HD audio
HD Video

1GB of memory and FAST

and very little $$$ compared to what you are used to!

here is a link to check it out:rasp pi

software list for ham radio is XXXXXXX

then i will point you to what you can do with it with Ham radio




here are some I found on dxzone
Hamnet on a Raspberry Pi - Initial set up of Broadband Hamnet on a Raspberry Pi....
GNU Radio on Raspberry Pi 2 - Taking the Raspberry Pi 2 for a Test Drive with GNU Radio. Installing ...
ADS-B flight tracker with Raspberry Pi - Build and run your own ADS-B receiver for 100 USD with a Raspberry Pi...
Raspberry Pi SDR Receiver - Get started with SDR using a Raspberry Pi and inexpensive RTL-SDR tune...
D-Star radio access point with Raspberry Pi - Getting your Raspberry PI up and running your D-Star radio kit. This w...
FM broadcast transmitter Raspberry Pi - This simple hack turns your Raspberry Pi into a powerful FM transmitte...
Raspberry Pi WSPR beacon - How to build a simple WSPR beacon using the Raspberry Pi for the trans...
RemoteQTH with Raspberry - Software running on the Raspberry PI, Control up to 8 arduino rotators...
SDR Server with Raspberry Pi - Setting up a Raspberry Pi as a SDR Server with RTL-2832U USB dongle ...
WSPR beacon on Raspberry Pi - Settng up a 40 meter WSPR beacon based on Raspberry Pi by VA3PAW.


ham radio/raspberrey pi>hamradioscience


to get a raspberry pi to work with linux (raspbian) the drivers were already there for many ham radio apps

to get the audio working for raspberry pi and linux:

install alsa a mp3 tool and wav to mp3 conversion:

> sudo apt-get install alsa-utils
> sudo apt-get install mpg321
> sudo apt-get install lame

enable sound module, then reboot
> lsmod snd-bcm2835
> sudo modprobe snd-bcm2835

then just use
>aplay xxxx.wav


there are a few Ham Radio Linux distributions for Raspberry pi:

1. KB1OIQ Andy ham radio for linux>KB1OIQ
2. raspberryconnect>RASPBERRYCONNECT
3. raspberrypi.org>RASPBERRYPI
4. ubuntumate> ubuntumate
5. linux.org.au>australian linux group



for digital modes ham radio and linux you need a new radio or some type of tnc or analog to digital converter.

so there are a few: Rigblaster - by west mountain radio or signlalink by www.tigertronics.com/slusbmain.htm

Ham radio deluxe is only for windows you CAN run wine but good luck people say it works ok
but I prefer not to run wine ( I might as well run windows)
so programs i would suggest:
FLDIGI for most digital modes CW, rtty, psk
ECHOLINK echolink
VOACAP
ALARMEJT>alarmjt
FREEDV>that allows any SSB radio to be used for low bit rate digital voice.
MMTTY > rtty
MMSSTV> slow scan tv
WSTOOLS>Linux version of the JT44 and FSK441 communications protocols, usually described together as WSJT.
HAMLIB>HAMLIB LINK
ICOM> This program controls ICOM radio transceivers and receivers with the CI-V option.








Monday, June 1, 2015

Reserve your seat for YL SSTV net 6/10/15 check in at 11UTC on 14.288



YL Wednesday night schedule for PSK31 and SSTV

June 3 11 UTC PSK31 14.070 done
June 10 23 UTC SSTV 14.230
June 17 23 UTC PSK31 14.070
June 24 23 UTC SSTV 14.230

CHECK IN FIRST ON 14.288.

here is download and links for SSTV: hamsoft.cs/pages/mmsstv.php

here is download and links for PSK31: http://www.dxzone.com/cgi-bin/dir/jump2.cgi?ID=17599

here is a excellent link from ARRL: www.arrl.org/news/10-tips-for-the-psk31-digital-mode

many people use fldigi for many digital modes.

so hope to see you on June 3 for first PSK31 session.

LET ME KNOW YOU ARE THERE... EVEN IF YOU ARE JUST LOOKING

NEXT week will be Slow Scan TV SSTV all you need is one picture to test.



if you would like to do a quick test with me email me for a quick schedule.
KA1ULN@MAIL.COM or just add a comment under the subject on the blog topic.
KA1ULN.BLOGSPOT.COM

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Video of Vermont YLRL member

Here is another video of YLRL member in VERMONT

Video of W1MP YL IN VERMONT

here is a video of Linda (W1MP) getting her antenna installed


remember Linda W1MP is the only YLRL member in Vermont

33 73

Pictures from W1MP qth.... getting new antennas installed YL in VERMONT


W1MP getting new antennas installed








here are pictures from W1MP Linda in Vermont installation of her antennas..... NOW you SHOULD be able to have a decent QSO with her.
she is one of few YLRL members in Vermont.....

33



Sunday, May 24, 2015

JT65 and JT65A try it


have you tried JT65 or JT65a?


I seem to have grasped JT65 quicker than psk31.... i was having a problem with my sound or being able to TX
for a long time.... exact setting of sound on all devices are critical.

with JT65 it is not so bad..... easy....

JT65 Frequencies:


VFO FREQ
28076.0 kHz USB

24917.0 kHz USB alternate 24920.0 kHz USB

21076.0 kHz USB

18102.0 kHz USB alternate 18098.0 kHz USB

14076.0 kHz USB alternate 14075.0 kHz USB

10139.0 kHz USB alternate 10138.0 kHz USB
alternate 10137.0 kHz USB

7039.0 kHz USB alternate 7036.0 kHz USB (USA) 7076.0 kHz USB

3576.0 kHz USB



JT65 is intended for extremely weak but slowly-varying signals, such as those found on troposcatter or Earth-Moon-Earth (EME, or "moonbounce") paths. It can decode signals many decibels below the noise floor, and often allows amateurs to successfully exchange contact information without signals being audible to the human ear. Like the other digital modes, multiple-frequency shift keying is employed. However unlike the other digitalmodes, messages are transmitted as atomic units after being compressed and then encoded with a process known as forward error correction (or "FEC"). The FEC adds redundancy to the data, such that all of a message may be successfully recovered even if some bits are not received by the receiver. (The particular code used for JT65 is Reed-Solomon.) Because of this FEC process, messages are either decoded correctly or not decoded at all, with very high probability. After messages are encoded, they are transmitted using MFSK with 65 tones. Operators have also begun using the JT65 mode for contacts on the HF bands, often using QRP (very low transmit power usually less than 5 watts). While the mode was not originally intended for HF use, its popularity has resulted in several new programs being developed and enhancements to the original WSJT in order to facilitate HF operation.
To hear what a JT65 signal sounds like, click the sound icon



here are some notes on JT65 for you... please post any questions of comments below..
Thank you so much for watching my blog.

http://nw7us.us/jt65a.html

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Beginning WSPR - everything you need to get started



here is what you should peruse to initiate yourself in this.
http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/k1jt/

www.wsprnet.org
(is where you will be logged into most of the time to
SEE the stations you have contacted)


tip: remember this is NOT a contestable mode yet.

check out or comment on what you find and learn with this information

thanx a bunch

KA1ULN
33


Antenna Grounding


The third in a series presentation on Antennas will be presented
on Echolink NFARA-R repeater on Thursday May 21, at 8 pm.
This net is for Yl's only however OM's are invited to listen.

If you have any special requests on Antenna grounding please
enter your suggestion or comment or question here in the comments section.


presentation will be KB4GQN Melanie on Radials and Counterpoise's
KA1ULN Niece on Rods and Straps/ribbons.

the notes for the presentation will be on the pages tab.

73

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Please leave comments or questions


I love sharing my information with everyone, however I would love it if
YOU would comment or ask questions about topics.

SO DON'T BE AFRAID ASK A QUESTION? IF YOU DON'T WANT OTHERS TO SEE IT I THINK THERE
IS AN OPTION NOT TO DISPLAY IT... BUT I GUARANTEE YOU I WILL SEE IT

what other topics would YOU love to hear /see about?


33/88

Friday, April 24, 2015

Get ready for 2m MoonBounce communications EME Earth Moon Earth


we are very interested in EME and always have been... i got the antenna for it and i am ready to go.

i have the Cushcraft 17B2 http://www.cushcraftamateur.com/Product.php?productid=A17B2

i have the 50 watts 2 meter radio

i just need the TIME

shoot me an email if you are also into and interested in EME

here is a great link to help you get started

Moonbounce is often equivalent with large antennas, low feed line losses, T/R relays, LNA's, HPA's,
Weaksignal detection, Moon tracking, lots of labor and system maintenance.







Amateur-radio moonbounce generally requires the following:

A sensitive receiver with a narrowband filter

A transmitter capable of operating on at least one amateur band above 144 MHz, and capable of producing 1500 watts of continuous radio-frequency output

An antenna with high directivity and gain, capable of being rotated in both the azimuth and elevation planes

A location in which the moon can be seen without obstruction for extended periods

A location in which humanmade radio noise is minimal

Neighbors who will tolerate the presence of a large antenna and the proximity of a high-power radio transmitter

A neighborhood without ordinances or covenants prohibiting large antennas and/or high-power radio transmitters

Operating skill and patience


Thursday, April 23, 2015

BPSK31 how to


Want to to learn a Digital mode for AMATEUR RADIO? BPSK31

First of all what is PSK:
What is PSK?
– PSK is an acronym for Phase Shift Keying. Information is transmitted
through patterns of polarity-reversals (180 degree phase shifts), hence the
name.
– Narrow-band, low-power, soundcard-generated radioteletype mode for
keyboard chat.
– Three data rates, 31, 63 and 125 baud. Bandwidth increases with rate.
– PSK31 is the most commonly used, its data rate is close to the speed of the
average typist.
– PSK is resistant to interference but has no error control, so it's not suitable
for transfer of data files. © 2013 Eric Fowler / WV3E – All rights reserved.

HERE IS WHAT YOU NEED:

Fldigi is a computer program intended for Amateur Radio Digital Modes operation using a PC (Personal Computer). Fldigi operates (as does most similar software) in conjunction with a conventional HF SSB radio transceiver, and uses the PC sound card as the main means of input from the radio, and output to the radio. These are audio-frequency signals. The software also controls the radio by means of another connection, typically a serial port.

Fldigi is multi-mode, which means that it is able to operate many popular digital modes without switching programs, so you only have one program to learn. Fldigi includes all the popular modes, such as DominoEX, MFSK16, PSK31, and RTTY.

Unusually, Fldigi is available for multiple computer operating systems; FreeBSD™; Linux™, OS X™ and Windows™.
(taken from w1hjk.com)


how to recognize the bpsk31:

Recognising the different modes comes with experience. It is a matter of listening to the signal, and observing the appearance of the signal on the tuning display. You can also practise transmitting with the transceiver disconnected, listening to the sound of the signals coming from the computer. There is also (see later paragraph) an automatic tuning option which can recognise and tune in most modes for you.

The software provides a tuning display which shows the radio signals that are receivable within the transceiver passband. Using a point and click technique with the mouse, you can click on the centre of a signal to select it, and the software will tune it in for you. Some modes require more care than others, and of course you need to have the software set for the correct mode first — not always so easy!

The RSID (automatic mode detection and tuning) feature uses a special sequence of tones transmitted at the beginning of each transmission to identify and tune in the signals received. For this feature to work, not only do you need to enable the feature in the receiver, but in addition the stations you are wishing to tune in need to have this feature enabled on transmission. Other programs also offer this RSID feature as an option.


PSK31 Frequencies In MHz,

1.838
3.580
7.040 to 7.060 for region 1 and region 3, and 7.070 for region 2 *
10.140
14.070
18.100
21.080 (although most activity can be found 10 kHz lower)
24.920
28.120



for more information check

http://nharc.org/links/OperatingPSK.pdf



10-10 Spring Digital QSO PARTY 0001 UTC Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday.


Spring Digital QSo Party
Export Event

From Saturday 25 April 2015
To Sunday 26 April 2015


Location : 10 Meters
Contact : Dan Morris KZ3T
Logs must be postmarked NLT May 11, 2015
tentencontest@ten-ten.org
dbmorris315@gmail.com (Alternate)

Upload logs at the KJ4IZW if possible, otherwise email logs to either of above addresses.

Spring Digital - held on the last full weekend in April. 0001 UTC Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday.

5.2.3 FREQUENCY AND MODES

Direct unassisted contacts only are permitted. Repeater, Satellite, IRLP, Echolink, or any other similar type of assisted contacts are NOT allowed. Based on the appropriate band plan for the country of operator, CW QSO Parties should be operated in the CW area of the 10 meter band and operated using CW only. Digital QSO Parties should be operated in the digital area of the 10 meter band and operated using Digital modes only (RTTY, PSK, etc).

NOTE: A QUIET ZONE between 28.490 and 28.510 shall be in effect during QSO Parties using the Phone portion of the 10 meter band to allow for others to use the band.

5.2.6 EXCHANGE

10-10 members send call sign, name, 10-10# and QTH (State, Province or Country). If received exchange does not have a 10-10#, then record a zero(0) in the log.

For more information in this PLEASE check out:


Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Nashua Area Radio Club Tech License Training Class May 9

The Nashua Area Radio Club is putting together Technician License Training Class starting on May 9 and going for 7 weeks. WE would love to see YL’s join the class. The information on the class is as follows:








The class will cost $35 which includes a copy of the ARRL Technician HAM radio Licensing Manual and a printed copy of the course materials. Pre-registration is required. We will be teaching using the ARRL lesson plan which includes demos and video material to make the class interesting and a great learning experience for new HAMs. We will hold a License testing session at the end of the course so that folks can earn their Technician License. Folks can contact Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC using the information above to register.


Friday, April 17, 2015

Extra question pool with answers. - antennas

What is included in the total resistance of an antenna system?

Radiation resistance plus ohmic resistance.
---
Which of the following describes an isotropic radiator?

A theoretical radiator used to compare other antennas

When is it useful to refer to an isotropic radiator?

When comparing the gains of directional antennas
---
How much gain does a 1/2-wavelength dipole have over an isotropic radiator?

About 2.1 dB
---
Which of the following antennas has no gain in any direction?
Isotropic radiator
---
Which of the following describes the radiation pattern of an isotropic radiator?

A sphere with the antenna in the center
---
Why would one need to know the feed point impedance of an antenna?

To match impedances for maximum power transfer
---

What factors determine the radiation resistance of an antenna?

Antenna location with respect to nearby objects and the conductors' length/diameter ratio
---
What is the term for the ratio of the radiation resistance of an antenna to the total resistance of the system?

Antenna efficiency
---
What is included in the total resistance of an antenna system?

Radiation resistance plus ohmic resistance.
---
What is a folded dipole antenna?
A dipole whose ends are connected by a one-half wavelength piece of wire
---
What is meant by antenna gain?

The numerical ratio relating the radiated signal strength of an antenna to that of another antenna
---
What is meant by antenna bandwidth?

The frequency range over which an antenna can be expected to perform well
---
How can the approximate beamwidth of a beam antenna be determined?

Note the two points where the signal strength of the antenna is down 3 dB from the maximum signal point and compute the angular difference
---
How is antenna efficiency calculated?

(radiation resistance / total resistance) x 100%
---
How can the efficiency of an HF grounded vertical antenna be made comparable to that of a half-wave dipole antenna?

By installing a good ground radial system
---
What theoretical reference antenna provides a comparison for antenna measurements?
Isotropic radiator
---
How much gain does an antenna have over a 1/2-wavelength dipole when it has 6 dB gain over an isotropic radiator?

About 3.9 dB
---

Which of the following describes the directivity of an isotropic radiator?

No directivity at all
---
What is meant by radiation resistance of an antenna?

The value of resistance that would dissipate the same amount of power as that radiated from an antenna.
---
What determines the free-space polarization of an antenna?

The orientation of its electric field (E Field)
---
In the free-space H-Field radiation pattern shown in Figure E9-1, what is the 3-dB beamwidth?

50 degrees
---
In the free-space H-Field pattern shown in Figure E9-1, what is the front-to-back ratio?

18 dB
---
In the free-space H-field pattern shown in Figure E9-1, what is the front-to-side ratio?

14 dB
---
What information is needed to accurately evaluate the gain of an antenna?

All of these choices
---
Which is NOT an important reason to evaluate a gain antenna across the whole frequency band for which it was designed?

The dielectric constant may vary significantly
---
What usually occurs if a Yagi antenna is designed solely for maximum forward gain?

The feed-point impedance becomes very low
---
If the boom of a Yagi antenna is lengthened and the elements are properly retuned, what usually occurs?

The gain increases
---
What type of computer program is commonly used for modeling antennas?

Method of Moments
---
What is the principle of a Method of Moments analysis?

A wire is modeled as a series of segments, each having a distinct value of current
---
What is the radiation pattern of two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/2-wavelength apart and fed 180 degrees out of phase?
Figure-8 end-fire in line with the antennas
---
What is the radiation pattern of two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/4-wavelength apart and fed 90 degrees out of phase?

Unidirectional cardioid
---
What is the radiation pattern of two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/2-wavelength apart and fed in phase?

Figure-8 broadside to the antennas
---
What is the radiation pattern of two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/4-wavelength apart and fed 180 degrees out of phase?

Figure-8 end-fire in line with the antennas
---
What is the radiation pattern for two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/8-wavelength apart and fed 180 degrees out of phase?

Figure-8 end-fire in line with the antennas
---
What is the radiation pattern for two 1/4-wavelength vertical antennas spaced 1/4-wavelength apart and fed in phase?

Elliptical
---
Which of the following is the best description of a resonant rhombic antenna?

Bidirectional; four-sided, each side approximately one wavelength long; open at the end opposite the transmission line connection
---
What are the advantages of a terminated rhombic antenna?
Wide frequency range, high gain and high front-to-back ratio
---
What are the disadvantages of a terminated rhombic antenna for the HF bands?

A large area and four sturdy supports for proper installation
---
What is the effect of a terminating resistor on a rhombic antenna?

It changes the radiation pattern from essentially bidirectional to essentially unidirectional
---
What type of antenna pattern over real ground is shown in Figure E9-2?
Elevation pattern
---
In the H field antenna radiation pattern shown in Figure E9-2, what is the elevation angle of the peak response?

7.5 degrees
---
In the H field antenna radiation pattern shown in Figure E9-2, what is the front-to-back ratio?

28 dB
---
In the H field antenna radiation pattern shown in Figure E9-2, how many elevation lobes appear in the forward direction?
4
---
How is the far-field elevation pattern of a vertically polarized antenna affected by being mounted over seawater versus rocky ground?

The low-angle radiation increases
---
If only a modest on-ground radial system can be used with an eighth-wavelength-high, inductively loaded vertical antenna, what would be the best compromise to minimize near-field losses?

A wire-mesh screen at the antenna base, an eighth-wavelength square
---
What is one characteristic of a Beverage antenna?

For best performance it should be longer than one wavelength
---
How would the electric field be oriented for a Yagi with three elements mounted parallel to the ground?

Horizontally
---
What strongly affects the shape of the far-field, low-angle elevation pattern of a vertically polarized antenna?

The conductivity and dielectric constant of the soil
---
Why are elevated-radial counterpoises popular with vertically polarized antennas?

They reduce the near-field ground losses, compared to on-ground radial systems using more radials
---
What is a terminated rhombic antenna?

A unidirectional antenna terminated in a resistance equal to its characteristic impedance
---
What factors determine the receiving antenna gain required at an amateur satellite station in earth operation?

Height, transmitter power and antennas of satellite
---
What factors determine the EIRP required by an amateur satellite station in earth operation?

Satellite antennas and height, satellite receiver sensitivity
---
What is the approximate beamwidth of a symmetrical pattern antenna with a gain of 20 dB as compared to an isotropic radiator?

20 degrees
---
How does the gain of a parabolic dish antenna change when the operating frequency is doubled?

Gain increases 6 dB
---
How is circular polarization produced using linearly polarized antennas?

Arrange two Yagis perpendicular to each other, with the driven elements in the same plane, fed 90 degrees out of phase
---
How does the beamwidth of an antenna vary as the gain is increased?

It decreases
---
Why does a satellite communications antenna system for earth operation need to have rotators for both azimuth and elevation control?

In order to track the satellite as it orbits the earth
---
For a shortened vertical antenna, where should a loading coil be placed to minimize losses and produce the most effective performance?

Near the center of the vertical radiator
---
Why should an HF mobile antenna loading coil have a high ratio of reactance to resistance?

To minimize losses
---
What is a disadvantage of using a trap antenna?

It will radiate harmonics
---
How must the driven element in a 3-element Yagi be tuned to use a hairpin matching system?

The driven element reactance is capacitive
---
What is the equivalent lumped-constant network for a hairpin matching system on a 3-element Yagi?

L network
---
What happens to the bandwidth of an antenna as it is shortened through the use of loading coils?

It is decreased
---
What is an advantage of using top loading in a shortened HF vertical antenna?

Improved radiation efficiency
---
What is the approximate input terminal impedance at the center of a folded dipole antenna?

300 ohms
---
Why is a loading coil often used with an HF mobile antenna?

To tune out the capacitive reactance
---
What is an advantage of using a trap antenna?

It may be used for multi-band operation
---
What happens at the base feed-point of a fixed length HF mobile antenna as the frequency of operation is lowered?

The resistance decreases and the capacitive reactance increases
---
What is the beamwidth of a symmetrical pattern antenna with a gain of 30 dB as compared to an isotropic radiator?

6.4 degrees
---
What is the beamwidth of a symmetrical pattern antenna with a gain of 15 dB as compared to an isotropic radiator?

36 degrees
---
What is the beamwidth of a symmetrical pattern antenna with a gain of 12 dB as compared to an isotropic radiator?

51 degrees
---
What system matches a high-impedance transmission line to a lower impedance antenna by connecting the line to the driven element in two places, spaced a fraction of a wavelength each side of element center?

The delta matching system
---
: What system matches an unbalanced feed line to an antenna by feeding the driven element both at the center of the element and at a fraction of a wavelength to one side of center?

The gamma matching system
---
What impedance matching system uses a short perpendicular section of transmission line connected to the feed line near the antenna?

The stub matching system
---
What should be the approximate capacitance of the resonating capacitor in a gamma matching circuit on a Yagi beam antenna for the 20-meter band?

140 pF
---
What should be the approximate capacitance of the resonating capacitor in a gamma matching circuit on a Yagi beam antenna for the 10-meter band?

70 pF
---
What is the velocity factor of a transmission line?

The velocity of the wave on the transmission line divided by the velocity of light in a vacuum
---
What determines the velocity factor in a transmission line?

Dielectrics in the line
---
Why is the physical length of a coaxial cable transmission line shorter than its electrical length?

RF energy moves slower along the coaxial cable
---
What is the typical velocity factor for a coaxial cable with polyethylene dielectric?

0.66
---
What would be the physical length of a typical coaxial transmission line that is electrically one-quarter wavelength long at 14.1 MHz? (Assume a velocity factor of 0.66.)

3.5 meters
---
What is the physical length of a parallel conductor feed line that is electrically one-half wavelength long at 14.10 MHz? (Assume a velocity factor of 0.95.)

10 meters
---
What parameter best describes the interactions at the load end of a mismatched transmission line?

Reflection coefficient
---
Which of the following measurements describes a mismatched transmission line?

An SWR greater than 1:1
---
What characteristic will 450-ohm ladder line have at 50 MHz, as compared to 0.195-inch-diameter coaxial cable (such as RG-58)?

Lower loss in dB/100 feet
---
What is the term for the ratio of the actual velocity at which a signal travels through a transmission line to the speed of light in a vacuum?

Velocity factor
---
What would be the physical length of a typical coaxial transmission line that is electrically one-quarter wavelength long at 7.2 MHz? (Assume a velocity factor of 0.66.)

6.9 meters
---
What kind of impedance does a 1/8-wavelength transmission line present to a generator when the line is shorted at the far end?

An inductive reactance
---
What kind of impedance does a 1/8-wavelength transmission line present to a generator when the line is open at the far end?

A capacitive reactance
---
What kind of impedance does a 1/4-wavelength transmission line present to a generator when the line is open at the far end?

A very low impedance
---
What kind of impedance does a 1/4-wavelength transmission line present to a generator when the line is shorted at the far end?

A very high impedance
---
What kind of impedance does a 1/2-wavelength transmission line present to a generator when the line is shorted at the far end?

A very low impedance
---






 

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

YLRL nets - everyday



Alaska Pacific Preparedness Net

14.292
1630 UTC (0830 Alaska Standard time)
Monday-Friday


Tangle Net

14.297
1800 UTC
Thursday
Pat K7DUC - net control
Sue KA6SOC - assistant net control

Because of interference, we will start at 14.297 but will then move to 14.297.50. This sure helps with the QRM.


Thursday Night YL Net

0100 UTC (Summer) or 0200 UTC (Winter)
20M (14.288.0+/- & 40M (7.198+/-)
Starts alternate weekly between the 2 bands
Net starts on the hour on one band and switches on the 1/2 to the other
Anne WB1ARU - Net Control
All YLs are encouraged to call and contact any YL they can hear on either band.


Thursday Night 2M/EchoLink YL Net

Please invite all YLs you know to join us! YL Net begins at 8:00 PM EDT Thursday which currently equates to 0000 UTC Friday. You can join via RF on 145.47 (-) PL 100.0Hz or
ECHOLink Node 560686 (NF4GA-R).

TIME CHANGE NOTE! PLEASE READ- United States has moved to Daylight Saving Time. Therefore, the YL Net starts at 0000 UTC Friday Each Week Until November 2015! This keeps the net to 8 pm Eastern (Daylight)



if YOU know of any more YL nets please send details to ka1uln@mail.com

thanks a bunch


YL challenge for certificates and QSO's

Yl's Amateur Radio Operators have been challenged to EARN YLRL certificates.

1. information about YLRL certificates are here: http://ylrl.org/index.php/ylrl-certificates

2. who can get the most YL contact in the Month of May 2015?



check out YLRL facebook or YLRL.org for more information

good luck

33
KA1ULN




Thursday, April 9, 2015

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

ARISS SSTV APRIL 11 and April 12 2015



Tuesday, March 31, 2015
SSTV in April for Cosmonautics day
The Russian ARISS team will be activating SSTV from the ISS service module as part of the celebration related to Cosmonautics Day. The setup of the hardware starts at 10:00 UTC on April 11 and activation should occur soon afterwards. The transmissions are currently scheduled to conclude at 21:30 UTC that same day. The transmissions should be active world wide on the standard down-link of 145.800 MHz.
More information on Cosmonautics day is available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmonautics_Day.

**UPDATE** April 7

ARISS Russia coordinator has stated that the event will operate on April 12 as well during the same 10:00-21:30 UTC time frame.

ARISS-SSTV FREQUENCIES







ISS Frequencies

Voice and SSTV downlink - 145.800
Voice Uplink- ITU 1 (Europe, Africa & Russia) - 145.200
Voice Uplink - ITU 2&3 (Everywhere else) - 144.490
VHF Packet up and downlink - 145.825
UHF packet up and downlink - 437.550
U/v Repeater Uplink - 437.80
U/v Repeater downlink - 145.8

Vertical Dipole Antennas 10 and 15 meters




this is a dipole I am planning on making....

Vertical Dipole for 15 Meters and would love to make one also for 10 meters.

feet = 468/28.390 = 16.50 feet 10 meters

feet = 468/21.325 = 22 feet 15 meters

so watch for my videos on this...

I have 12 gauge shielded wire (good stuff) for verticals


ka1uln

Monday, April 6, 2015

OK/OM DX Contest, SSB: 1200Z, Apr 11 to 1200Z, Apr 12


Mode: SSB
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Single Band
Multi-Single
Multi-Two
SWL
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: OK/OM: RS + 3-letter district code
non-OK/OM: RS + Serial No.
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: OK/OM-Station: 2 points per QSO with same country
OK/OM-Station: 3 points per QSO with different country, same continent
OK/OM-Station: 5 points per QSO with different continent
non-OK/OM: 10 points per QSO with OK/OM station
non-OK/OM: 1 point per QSO same country
non-OK/OM: 3 points per QSO with different country, same continent
non-OK/OM: 5 points per QSO with different continent
Multipliers: Each OK/OM county once per band
Each country once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: April 26, 2015
Upload log at: http://okomdx.crk.cz/index.php?page=send-log
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://okomdx.crk.cz/index.php?page=english

How to work satellites with ham radio

Question: How did you setup your satellite station?

What do you use?
Radio, antenna, coax, computer

73 ka1uln



here is a make article i found... it is very clear and simple to understand
http://makezine.com/2009/07/22/catching-satellites-on-ham-radio/?thankyou=true

Materials
All you need is a VHF/UHF FM receiver (like a police scanner) or a VHF/UHF transceiver (like a Yaesu VX-7) and an antenna.


1. Specifying your location
Start by visiting Heavens-Above.com to check the orbit of the satellite you want to listen to and specify your location.

2. Specifying a satellite
Check the passes of your specific satellite or the ISS. AO-51, SO-50, AO-27, ISS. Make sure that the passes are shown for your correct location.
satelliteschart.jpg

3. Reading the chart
This pass chart shows the Start (when/where the satellite enters on the horizon), the Max. Altitude (when/where the satellite is at its highest point in the sky), and the End (when/where the satellite finishes it’s pass). Alt. is the altitude, the angle of the satellite from the observer’s horizon. 0 degrees is exactly on the horizon, and 90 degrees is directly above the observer. Az. is the Azimuth, the cardinal direction of the satellite from the observer’s point of view.

4. Picking a good pass
Satellites orbit the Earth at all sorts of angles, some that are very close to the horizon and some that are directly overhead. It is much easier to hear a satellite that passes directly overhead. To find a good sat pass, check the Max. Altitude Alt. for a pass that is 45 or higher (the higher the better). In our example, the second pass at 7:28 looks like a good one since the Max. Altitude Alt. is 77. The first pass at 5:52 has a Max. Altitude Alt. of only 12 which is very close to the horizon and difficult to pick up.

5. Finding the frequency
Satellite repeaters work with two different frequencies, an uplink and a downlink. You will listen to signals received on the downlink. If you wish to transmit, you’ll need to program in the uplink frequency as well. Follow the corresponding links to find the FM repeater frequencies of the satellites. The frequencies often change, so be sure to check the websites for the latest updates. AO-51, SO-50, AO-27, ISS. Tune your radio to the downlink frequency and you’re ready to go outside and listen (example: 435.300 MHz FM).
satellitewhipantenna copy.jpg

6. Aiming a whip antenna
If you’re using a whip antenna, you will not aim the antenna directly at the satellite. Instead, you’ll keep it perpendicular to the satellite. You can rotate the antenna by rotating your wrist to try and get a clearer signal.

7. Following the pass with the antenna
You will trace the path of the satellite orbit with the antenna using the Heavens-Above pass chart as a guide. At the Start Time, start with the antenna perpendicular to the Az. direction at the given Alt. For example, at 7:28, aim the antenna perpendicular to north at 10 degrees above the horizon. Trace the path of the satellite so that at the Max. Altitude Time the antenna is pointed in the corresponding location. For example, at 7:33, the antenna should be perpendicular to west northwest at 77 decrees above the horizon. Finish tracing the path of the satellite so that at the End Time the antenna is perpendicular to the corresponding location. For example at 7:39, the antenna will be perpendicular to south southwest at 10 degrees above the horizon. It can be very difficult trying to catch the satellites and you may spend a lot of time not hearing anything. As you trace the general path of the satellite with the antenna, move the antenna around in small side to side and up and down motions until you hear a bit of audio. Adjust the antenna to make the audio clearer.

8. Tuning the radio for the Doppler effect
The Doppler effect makes the frequency vary by .010 MHz. As you trace the path of the satellite with the antenna, you will also need to tune the radio back and forth plus or minus .010 MHz until you hear a good signal. Early in the pass, you will add .010 MHz, for example, if you’re listening on 435.300 MHz, you’ll need to tune the radio back and forth between 435.300 MHz and 435.310 MHz. Later in the pass, you will subtract .010 MHz, for example, you will tune the radio back and forth between 435.300 MHz and 435.290 MHz.

Here is an audio clip from my first satellite contacts. The contacts seem to be going pretty slowly, but while I was making them, I remember everything happening very quickly. It was a lot to tune the radio and maneuver the antenna while trying to write down the call signs of the contacts.
dianaeng
dianaeng

Fashion + Technology
Diana was a contestant on Project Runway season 2, graduated from RISD, and currently lives in New York City.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Slow Scan Television (SSTV)



Personally speaking, I get excited when the crew decides to send images from the ISS.
There is something about receiving pictures directly from the Space Station that almost
makes my hair stand on end. As with many other ARISS transmissions, SSTV also takes
place on 145.800 MHz. ARISS images are overlayed with the call sign NA1SS.
Most FM transceivers have an external speaker or headphone jack. To catch a
glimpse of these amazing images, all you have to do is attach an audio cable between
this jack and the LINE or MIC input of your computer sound card. The sound card will
convert the analog FM signal to digital data.

There is free software available that will decode the data and display the images on
your computer monitor. If you are a Windows aficionado, try MMSSTV at
http://mmham-soft.amateur-radio.ca/mmsstv/ , or the mul-timode program Ham Radio Deluxe
at www.ham-radio-deluxe.com (the Digital Master 780 module)
or MultiPSK(http://f6cte.free.fr/index_anglais.htm).

Whichever program you choose, be sure to select the Robot 36 mode when receiving
ISS images. Depending on signal strength, the images may be noisy, but they are
still a thrill to see


Wednesday, April 1, 2015

LZ Open 40 m Sprint 0400-0800 Z April YL ops CW only

LZ Open 40m Sprint Contest: 0400Z-0800Z, Apr 4
Mode: CW
Bands: 40m Only
Classes: Single Op (High/Low/QRP)
Multi-Op
Straight Key
Lady Ops
Max power: QRP: 5W
Exchange: 3-Digit Serial No. + 3-Digit Serial No. received from last QSO
Work stations: Once each 30 minutes
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: April 14, 2015
E-mail logs to: LZ1GL[at]yahoo[dot]com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.lzopen.com/lzocc40/indexF.htm

Boxboro - The ARRL New England Convention 2015




THE ARRL NEW ENGLAND CONVENTION - BOXBORO! 2015

at the Holiday Inn in Boxborough, Massachusetts

August 21-22-23, 2015

TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

Purchase Tickets

Sunday, March 29, 2015

YL contests? what do you want?

what type of Yl contest would YOU (males or females) be interested in which focus would be on YL's only?

comment right here with all your suggestions
or email     KA1ULN1@GMAIL.COM


a 1 day contest
a 2 day contest

what about  having a contest with something like collect YL's from  X states in 1 day?
something like that?

put more here....

main section of Antenna, feedline COAX



this is what I refer to as the main section of the antenna.    check yours and reply here to let me know what state your coax is in?  it is wet, touching the trees, is it bent?   did you solder it perfect?

I always use the arrl antenna book when i am soldering coax.     check it out.

ps: check out   facebook.com/ylrl

33

got picture from http://www.jpole-antenna.com  thank you

Thursday, March 26, 2015

YLRL FACEBOOK PAGE is open and available

hello YL's

With a little research I have learned there is a Facebook page for us.   In order to see and post there you must search for "YOUNG LADIES' RADIO LEAGUE, Inc"

Pass this on to other YLs

Ka1uln

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

BUDDY-UP project by KA1ULN and YOU

who is your YL buddy? what projects have you worked on together? which Contests have you worked together?

do you need a YL Buddy? join us on the thursday night net, and listen or inquire about needed a Buddy.

TIP: make sure your buddy is within HF rangemeet us on thursday night on echolink (need smartphone, tablet, desktop computer or laptop

come to NFARL.DODROPIN.ORG for the echolink chatroom and on echolink search for NFarl NF4GA-R


33
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

hello,

thank you so much for visiting my blog.

please pass the word about BUDDY-UP.

This BUDDY-UP project is created to spark more YL's to push their PTT button, YL's work together, and/or

to get more YL (Young Ladies) involved in Amateur radio. (again)

here is more about my BUDDY-UP project:

GOAL: is to become a better operator with the help of a YL BUDDY

When working contests your buddy can hear you and give you feedback on how she is heard

in the pile up (this might help when trying for a successful 59 QSO by the operating station)

Can help with things like mike gain and other details like this that you the operator

cannot hear. Meetup with a buddy here on the net (thursday night - echolink NF4GA-R 8 pm est)

and work together.

Get email address from qrz.com

Figure out a schedule and work each other during the week. PLEASE comment below on who is your buddy

This works on all bands.

When you hear a YL on the air please give her priority!

check out YLRL.org

if you have more ideas on this YL BUDDY-UP project please send them to me KA1ULN@MAIL.COM

Thanx so much and BUDDY-UP (with one or more YL BUDDIES.)

PS: right now there are about 4-5 YL BUDDY-UP doing CW on 15 meters.

BUDDY-UP with them NOW.

check this blog everyday for more updates.

ka1uln (reminder: CONFIRM all Your QSO's)

33

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Amateur Radio Contests - up to date

here is a link to an incredible list of current contests.

http://www.hornucopia.com/contestcal/weeklycont.php

bookmark this for future reference.

73 ka1uln

PLEASE CONFIRM QSO'S

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

YL NET THURSDAY 8 PM (est) NF4GA-R ON ECHOLINK


Good evening Ladies!

This week we have another great YL net lined up! Niece KA1ULN has kindly offered to talk about Understanding Antennas Enough to Build a Dipole Safely – Round 2! Please invite all YLs you know to join us! YL Net begins at 8:00PM EDT Thursday which currently equates to 0000 UTC Friday. You can join via RF on 145.47 (-) PL 100.0Hz or ECHOLink Node 560686 (NF4GA-R). We want to encourage all YLs to participate!

Also, please feel free to log into the North Fulton Amateur Radio League Chat Room at http://nfarl.dodropin.org. Lots of ladies chat in there as well (no audio). If your audio is not working on Echolink, please let us know in the chat room if you have any comments or questions. Just go to the website, put your call sign-your name and click login and you’re in! Of course, Echolink also has chat available as well.

As a brief reminder, we welcome OMs to listen, but kindly request that only YLs check in as this net is specifically put together for YLs. Thanks again for such wonderful support from all!

Here’s this week’s agenda:

1. Welcome/Opening Remarks

2. Take Check-Ins

3. Understanding Antennas Enough to Build a Dipole With Safety – Part 2 – >From Niece KA1ULN
a. http://ka1uln.blogspot.com/p/understanding-antennas.html
b. Brief Recap of Last Week
c. How to Harmonically Operate Your Dipole
d. Selection of Coax for the Right Job
e. What are the different types of feedline/coax and what bands is it best used for?
f. What is Loss in Feedline/Coax and where does it come from?
g. Proper Length of your Feedline/Coax?
h. Dipoles/Baluns/Matching
i. Questions?

4. What’s New With You - Comments/Experiences/Weather Reports/Etc
a. Let’s catch up with any activites, stories, radio contacts, etc from this past week.
I. Your turn to share – what’s new with you? We encourage everyone to participate!

5. Active in your Club? What Kind of Topice Do They Discuss at Club Meetings?
a. Share some info about your local ham radio club
b. What makes your club meetings enjoyable? How often do you meet?
c. What kind of activities is your club involved in or help other amateur radio operators accomplish?
d. Any Other Comments on This Topic

6. Any announcements, questions, or specific point of interest you would like to share with the group
a. QRP ARCI Spring QSO Party: 1200Z, Apr 4 to 2359Z Apr 5
CW - http://www.qrparci.org/contests/spring-qso-party-2014
b. Mississippi QSO Party: 1400Z Apr 4 to 0200Z Apr 5 – No BBQ Required! - http://www.arrlmiss.org/2015_Mississippi_QSO_Party.pdf
c. Missouri QSO Party: 1400Z Apr 4 to 0400Z Apr 5 – “Show Me” Some Contacts! - http://www.w0ma.org/mo_qso_party.htm
d. Texas State Parks on the Air (How Refreshing!) 1600Z Apr 4 to 0159 Apr 5 - http://tspota.com/site/page?view=rules
e. Montana QSO Party 1800Z Apr 4 to 0559Z Apr 5 – As the Treasure State, Treasure Your Contacts in “The Big Sky Country”! - http://www.fvarc.org/…/…/2014%20MT%20QSO%20Party%20Rules.pdf
f. YLISSB Has 2015 Convention in Erwin, TN June 17-21 This Year - http://www.ylsystem.org/
g. LZ Open 40 m Sprint 0400-0800 Z April YL ops CW only
h. Other Announcements/News

7. Last call for check-ins

8. Close Net and Return Repeater to Normal Use

9. Hop over to 20 Meters 14.288MHz (subject to change to 40m depending on band conditions) for YLRL Net with WB1ARU.

Please send any topic suggestions or feedback you may have to kk4ubq@arrl.net! Catherine would love to hear from you as this is your YL net!

Thank you for joining us.

33,
Lori, K4UPI and Catherine, KK4UBQ
*NFARL* Chat
nfarl.dodropin.org






++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Good evening Ladies! I have to say special thanks to Lori K4UPI for such a great net last week!!!
She did such an awesome job, and I thank all of you for supporting her as well! Hope everyone can make
it to the YL net this week! Please invite all YLs you know to join us on the YL Net! Net begins at 8:00PM EST
Thursday which equates to 01:00 UTC Friday. You can join via RF on 145.47 (-) PL 100.0Hz or ECHOLink Node 560686 (NF4GA-R).

We want to encourage all YLs to participate! Also, we encourage all of you to log into the North Fulton
Amateur Radio League Chat Room at http://nfarl.dodropin.org. Lots of ladies chat in there as well. If your audio
is not working on Echolink, please let us know in the chat room if you have anything/comments you’d like to add or
questions and Allison and Lori (and others) will help me catch it. Just go to the website, put yourcallsign-yourname
and click login and you’re in! No password needed. Of course, Echolink also has chat available as well.

As a brief reminder, we welcome OMs to listen, but kindly request that only YLs check in as this net is specifically put
together for YLs. Thanks again for such wonderful support from all! Here’s this week’s agenda (subject to change depending
on time constraints etc):

1. Welcome/Opening Remarks
2. Take Check-Ins
3. Why Ham Radio is Still Important! – Ham Radio Post Hurricane Katrina
a. Please view the video found here prior to the Net - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IITBpLQmmiI
b. Brief Article Regarding Ham Radio Operators After Katrina -
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/9228945/ns/technology_and_science-wireless/t/ham-radio-operators-rescue-after-katrina/#.VPUSEFco6Uk
c. What Did This Mean to You? Comments, etc.
4. What Is The Purpose Of Contesting?
a. Who participates in Ham Radio Contests and Why do You do it?
b. What can we learn when contesting?
c. What tips do you have for beginners?
d. Are you interested? What questions do you have?

5. What Ham Radio Activities Have You Done This Past Week?
a. Any fun ham radio experiences over the past week? Fun DX or local contacts?
6. Any announcements, questions, or specific point of interest you would like to share with the group
a. ARRL DX Phone Contest Next Weekend March 7th and 8th 2015!!!! Starts 0000 UTC Saturday and ends 2359 UTC Sunday! - http://www.arrl.org/arrl-dx
b. YLISSB Has 2015 Convention in Erwin, TN June 17-21 This Year - http://www.ylsystem.org/
c. As Time Permits, Open Time for questions, stories, or to Make Calls To Each Other

7. Last call for check-ins
8. Close Net and Return Repeater to Normal Use
9. Hop over to 20 Meters 14.288MHz (subject to change to 40m depending on band conditions) for YLRL Net with WB1ARU or AE7MB

Please send any topic suggestions or feedback you may have to kk4ubq@arrl.net or k4upi@arrl.net!
We would love to hear from you as this is your YL net! See Y’all Thursday/Friday!

Catherine KK4UBQ If you are not interested and would like to be removed from future emails regarding this net,
please reply to this email with Please Remove Me in the subject line. Your request will be honored.

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NOV: PODXS 70 psk31 - 160,80,40, FELD HELL Turkey sprint, ARRL ssb sweepstakes

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