Thursday, August 18, 2016

AUGUST contests/qso parties CW, RTTY, SSB, PSK, PHONE FRAY


***********************************************************************
NCCC RTTY Sprint: 0145Z-0215Z, Aug 26
Mode: RTTY
Bands: (see rules)
Classes: (none)
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: August 28, 2016
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rttyns.html
***********************************************************************

NCCC Sprint: 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 26
Mode: CW
Bands: (see rules)
Classes: (none)
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: August 28, 2016
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rules.html
***********************************************************************

Hawaii QSO Party: 0400Z, Aug 27 to 0400Z, Aug 29
Mode: CW, Phone, RTTY, PSK
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op Mixed (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Technician CW+SSB (200W)
Single Op CW (Low/High)
Single Op Digital High Power
Multi-Single
Multi-Multi
Max operating hours: Single Op: 18
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 150 watts
QRP: 5 watts CW/RTTY/PSK, 10 watts SSB
Exchange: HI: RS(T) + QTH ID
non-HI W/VE: RS(T) + (state/province)
DX: RS(T)
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: HI: Each HI QTH ID once
HI: Each state/province/territory/country once
non-HI: Each HI QTH ID once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: October 1, 2016
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://hawaiiqsoparty.org/LogUploads/Upload.html
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.hiqsoparty.org/Rules/HQP/HQPRules.html
***********************************************************************

ALARA Contest: 0600Z Aug 27 to 0559Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW, Phone
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 2m
Classes: Single Op
Exchange: ALARA: RS(T)A + Name
non-ALARA: RS(T) + Serial No. + Name + (whether YL/OM/club station)
Work stations: Once per 60 minutes per band per mode
QSO Points: 5 points per phone QSO with ALARA member
4 points per phone QSO with YL non-member
3 points per phone QSO with OM
Double points per QSO for CW
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: September 30, 2016
E-mail logs to: alaracontest[at]wia[dot]org[dot]au
Mail logs to: Mrs. Diane Main, VK4DI
PO Box 546
Gatton Qld 4343
Australia
Find rules at: http://www.alara.org.au/contests/
***********************************************************************

Keyman's Club of Japan Contest: 1200Z, Aug 27 to 1200Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Single Op Multiband
Single Op Single Band (JA Only)
SWL
Exchange: JA: RST + prefecture/district code
non-JA: RST + continent code
QSO Points: JA Station: 1 point per QSO with JA station
JA Station: 5 points per QSO with DX station
DX Station: 1 point per QSO with JA station
Multipliers: Each JA prefecture once per band
JA Station: Each continent once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 29, 2016
E-mail logs to: 2016kcjtest[at]kcj−cw[dot]com
Mail logs to: T. Mori, JH6IEK
Saida 556-36
Tamamura machi, Sawa gun
Gunma 370-1131
Japan
Find rules at: http://www.kcj-cw.com/contest/16_kcj_contest_rule_e.pdf
***********************************************************************

SCC RTTY Championship: 1200Z, Aug 27 to 1159Z, Aug 28
Mode: RTTY
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (Low/High)
Single Op Single Band
Multi-Op
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 100 watts
Exchange: RST + 4-digit year license first issued
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with same country
2 points per QSO with same continent, different country
2 points per QSO between different W, VE, VK, ZL, ZS, JA and PY call areas, LU provinces and Asiatic Russia UA9/UA0 oblasts
3 points per QSO with different continent
Multipliers: Each 4-digit year licensed once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 5, 2016
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://lea.hamradio.si/scc/rtty/rtty_log_submission.htm
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://lea.hamradio.si/scc/rtty/rttyrules.htm
***********************************************************************

W/VE Islands QSO Party: 1200Z, Aug 27 to 0300Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW, Phone, Digital
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: W/VE Island Permanent (QRP/QRO)
W/VE Island Expedition (QRP/QRO)
W/VE Island Rover (QRP/QRO)
Non-Island W/VE (QRP/QRO)
Max power: QRO: >5W
QRP: 5W
Exchange: Islands: RS(T) + USI/CISA Island Designation
Non-Islands: RS(T) + (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per mode per band
Score Calculation: (see rules)
Submit logs by: September 15, 2016
E-mail logs to: ns4j[at]usislands[dot]org
Mail logs to: Jay Chamberlain NS4J
27 Fox Run Lane
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
USA
Find rules at: http://usislands.org/2016_contest_rules.html
***********************************************************************

YO DX HF Contest: 1200Z, Aug 27 to 1200Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW, SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (CW/SSB/Mixed)(High/Low)
Single Op Single Band
Multi-Op Single Transmitter
Youngster/Novice (<16y) Max power: High: >100W
Low: 100W or less
Exchange: YO: RS(T) + county
non-YO: RS(T) + Serial No.
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: 8 points per QSO with YO station
4 points per QSO with non-YO station on different continent
2 points per QSO with non-YO station in different country, same continent
1 point per QSO with non-YO station in same country
Multipliers: Each DXCC country (not YO) once per band
Each YO county once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 27, 2016
E-mail logs to: yodx-contest[at]hamradio[dot]ro
Mail logs to: FRR
P.O. Box 22-50
Bucharest RO-014780
Romania
Find rules at: http://www.yodx.ro/en/english
***********************************************************************

Kansas QSO Party: 1400Z, Aug 27 to 0200Z, Aug 28 and 1400Z-2000Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW, SSB, Digital
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Multi-Op
School
Mobile Single Op (CW/Mixed) Low Power
Mobile Multi-Op Single Radio Low Power
Mobile Unlimited
Mobile Unassisted Low Power
Mobile SSB Low Power
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: KS: RS(T) + county
non-KS: RS(T) + (state/VE section/"DX")
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: 2 points per phone QSO
3 points per CW/digital QSO
Bonus: 100 points for at least one QSO with KS0KS
Multipliers: KS: Each US state, VE section and "DX" once
non-KS: Each KS county once
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + Bonus Points
Submit logs by: October 1, 2016
E-mail logs to: logs[at]ksqsoparty[dot]org
Mail logs to: Kansas QSO Party
c/o Bob Harder, W0BH
Box 3000
Hesston, KS 67062
USA
Find rules at: http://ksqsoparty.org/rules/KSQPRules2016.pdf
***********************************************************************

Ohio QSO Party: 1600Z, Aug 27 to 0400Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW, SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (High/Low/QRP)
Multi-Op
EOC
Mobile
Rover
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: OH: RS(T) + county
non-OH: RS(T) + (state/province/"DX")
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: 1 point per SSB QSO
2 points per CW QSO
Multipliers: OH Stations: Each state, province, OH county, 1 DX once per mode
non-OH Stations: Each OH county once per mode
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults (see rules for mobile stations)
Submit logs by: September 26, 2016
Upload log at: http://www.ohqp.org/submitLogFileOhQP.html
Mail logs to: Ohio QSO Party
c/o Jim Stahl, K8MR
30499 Jackson Rd.
Chagrin Falls, OH 44022-1730
USA
Find rules at: http://www.ohqp.org/adminRules.htm
***********************************************************************

CVA DX Contest, SSB: 2100Z, Aug 27 to 2100Z, Aug 28
Mode: SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Single Band (Low/High)
Multi-Single (Low/High)
Multi-Two
Headquarters
Teen Single Op
YL Single Op
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: RS + type/UF(see rules)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: Each UF once per band
Each country once only
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: September 15, 2016
E-mail logs to: ssb[at]craec[dot]org
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.craec.org
***********************************************************************

SARL HF CW Contest: 1300Z-1630Z, Aug 28
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 20m
Classes: Single Op All Band
Single Op Single Band
Multi-Op All Band
Multi-Op Single Band
Exchange: RST + Serial No.
Score Calculation: (see rules)
Submit logs by: September 4, 2016
E-mail logs to: contest[at]netactive[dot]co[dot]za
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.sarl.org.za/Web3/Members/DoDocDownload.aspx?X=20
***********************************************************************

Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 31, 2016 Logs due: Sep 2
Status: Active
Mode: SSB
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m
Classes: Single Op
Max power: 100 watts
Exchange: NA: Name + (state/province/country)
non-NA: Name
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: NA station: 1 point per QSO
non-NA station: 1 point per QSO with an NA station
Multipliers: Each US state (including KH6/KL7) once per band
Each VE province/territory once per band
Each North American country (except W/VE) once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.perluma.com/Phone_Fray_Contest_Rules.pdf
***********************************************************************

thanx to wa7bnm

Thursday, August 11, 2016

ARRL The Doctor is In Podcast .. IS HERE


ARRL The Doctor is In Podcast

Welcome to the home of the bi-weekly ARRL The Doctor is In podcast -- a lively discussion of all things technical! The Doctor is none other than ARRL's Joel Hallas, W1ZRDoctor_is_In_Podcast_Icon_2.jpg, who has been answering questions about Amateur Radio in the Doctor Is In column in QST since 2006.

Hosted by ARRL Publications Manager Steve Ford, WB8IMY, ARRL The Doctor is In podcast is a twice-monthly, 20-minute podcast that answers YOUR questions about Amateur Radio's technical challenges.

You can subscribe to the podcast in Apple iTunes or on Stitcher.

Archived episodes will be available here.

Do you have a question for the Doctor? Click here to e-mail your question and we may answer it in a future podcast!




Download the arrl the doctor is in


taken from arrl.org

Monday, August 8, 2016

BOXBORO September 9, 10, & 11 and BARS meeting and VE session




September 9, 10, & 11 Boxboro 2016

Boxboro 2016

Forums, Classes, Banquets all three days
Exhibit Hall & Flea Market : Sat 9-5 & Sun 9-2

At the Holiday Inn Boxboro Woods, Boxborough, Massachusetts


Link to purchase tickets>

see ya there... LOOK FOR KA1ULN JUST SAY HI



*****************************************************************************
While you are in our neighborhood Please use our repeater 147.12 pl 103.5

we have a net on wednesday nights at 00:00 utc 8 pm est 147.12 103.5

if you are here on September 7 please come by the meeting

Next Meeting is September 7, 2016 at 7 PM.
Topic: CARD SORT and Pizza
Location: Matthews Memorial Church, 128 Gorham St., Chelmsford MA
*****************************************************************************
BARS VE session August 11 at 7:00 pm est
Location: Matthews Memorial Church, 128 Gorham St., Chelmsford MA



Friday, August 5, 2016

Try WSJT for weak signal contacts

I've done quite a few things in amateur radio, but one of the things I absolutely enjoy is DXing. I also enjoy pulling out the weak ones from a pileup or working weak signals in general.  But on traditional modes it can be a bit frustrating, especially on fickle bands like 6 meters. Enter the WSJT modes.

First things first, if you're looking to have a nice long chat with a friend, look elsewhere. The mode is not for this kind of stuff. Rather, you are getting a basic signal report and grid square exchange. You may exchange a short text message but only 13 characters maximum (move over, Twitter!) Secondly, you do not need to or want to run high power in most cases. This is great news for those who like to operate QRP. 

About the mode, history and origins

The mode was developed by noted Astrophysicist and Nobel Prize Laureate, Joe Taylor, K1JT. Joe's extensive resumé includes discovering pulsars using the NRAO radio telescopes in West Virginia. Prior to that he had worked with Jocelyn Bell, who had discovered the first pulsars. He first started out in amateur radio as a teenager and this fueled his interest in radio astronomy. One can clearly see how his love for "weak signal work" goes well beyond amateur radio or the solar system, for that matter. 

The mode can allow one to work signals that are not audible to the human ear, many dB below the noise floor. It does this by repetition and slow transmission. This is why you can't rag chew with it, but it is great for working DX and new grid squares.

It is used extensively for moonbounce (EME) where signals are reflected off the moon. However EME operators often use 500+ watts to compensate for path loss. Prior to the WSJT modes you'd see EME enthusiasts with stacks and stacks upon stacks of yagis pointing at the sky, and 1.5kw on 2 meters. They'd run CW and sometimes SSB. They'd send Ts to verify the signal and make skeds on HF or internet. While much of that is still done today, it is now possible to point at the moon and CQ with just one or two yagis and a few hundred watts. It is also possible to make contacts on supposedly dead bands like 6 meters. It is also possible to work DX on HF with small wire antennas.




Software setup

So how do you get cooking with JT modes anyway? We'll do a simple JT65 setup here. This is a very basic guide to get you started. 

You'll need:
  • SSB capable radio and your antenna
  • Sound card interface - external sound card interface like a SignaLink or some newer radios (like the Elecraft K3S or IC7300) have it built in and accessible via the USB port.
  • PC or Mac with WSJT software (JT65-HF or WSJT-X usually)
  • Internet synchronized PC clock (very important).
  • Patience and quick reaction time.

Once you get all of those together, you can then configure the software. I'll keep it simple as I use JT65-HF. WSJT-X is supposedly better but I've had better luck with JT65-HF. However, JT65-HF hasn't really been maintained since about 2013. But it still works very well. 

I use Windows for my shack PC but you can use any OS including Linux and Mac OS X. WSJT software and the protocol are all open source so you can compile it for any OS. 

A note about time sync: JT65 is a timed mode, meaning that everything fires off at certain times. Therefore your PC clock must be in sync. You can use software like Dimension 4 or Meinberg to do that. Unfortunately the built in time sync feature in Windows doesn't seem sufficient. You may need administrator privileges on your PC to do this.

Once you get the time sync portion straightened out and you've installed JT65-HF, you can set it up easily like this. Most important is the audio device (USB sound card) and your callsign and grid:


Make sure you have PTT and optionally, rig control (for band changes. It supports OmniRig and Ham Radio Deluxe, or serial port control. Note: if you have a SignaLink it uses VOX so there's no need to configure PTT in that case. But some sound card interfaces require it.



This is the main window:


You generally set your radio to USB (upper sideband) mode. Set power to low power (maximum 25-35 watts, many use 5 watts or less). Turn off speech compressor/processor. You can use the mode anywhere on the digital sub-bands but most people use the JT65 window. Here are the frequencies. Note that these are the dial frequencies in kHz you set your radio to:

  • 160m - 1836-1838
  • 80m - 3576
  • 40m - 7076
  • 20m - 14076
  • 30m - 10138
  • 20m - 14076
  • 17m - 18102
  • 15m - 21076
  • 12m - 24917
  • 10m - 28076
  • 6m - 50276
My favorite hangouts are 6m and 40m. I have worked many grids on 6m using JT65.

How a typical JT65 QSO works:

0001z  At the top of the minute a station will transmit "CQ <callsign> <grid square>" 
0002z  The responding operator will send her callsign and 4 digit grid square.
0003z: The CQing operator (who she has now answered) will send a signal report. 
0004z: The responding operator will send a "R" (roger) and her signal report
0005z: The CQing operator will send "RRR"
0006z: The responding operator will send "RRR"
0007z: The CQing operator will send "73"
0008z: The responding operator will send "73"

Yes, that is 8 whole minutes!

QSO is logged using the "log QSO" button. The signal report is in dB and is generated automatically. You can put in your transmitter power if desired. 

Most people take a shortcut and can cut that down to 6 minutes by omitting the RRRs from minute 5 and 6 and simply send 73s. 

So it would be something like this:

0001z - CQ KA1ULN FN41
0002z - KA1ULN N2RJ FN21
0003z - N2RJ KA1ULN -08
0004z - KA1ULN N2RJ -09
0005z - N2RJ KA1ULN 73
0006z - KA1ULN N2RJ 73

I hit "log QSO" button and I'm done. 




Note that each transmission lasts 47 seconds and you have to make your decision in 13 seconds what to transmit next. It's sort of like playing 5 minute lightning chess where you press the clock after each move, except that each move is timed. You will see the waterfall stop and a red line where you're supposed to transmit. You'll also see the decoded messages in the window. Messages sent to you are red. General CQs are green. If you have your headphones on you'll hear when the other side's transmission.

I wish there was a way to substitute 88 or 33 in the protocol but from what I gather, 73 is hard coded in the protocol. 

By the way, each transmission is basically brick on key for 47 seconds! This is one big reason why most people do not run high power as their rigs would overheat and their finals would burn up. 

But I was this close to working that rare grid on 6!

JT65-HF generates a log file in ADIF format that you can import into your log software. The log file is located at C:\Users\<your_username>\Appdata\JT65-HF\.  I prefer to consolidate my logs into Ham Radio Deluxe so this works perfectly for me. Then I can upload to LoTW and other systems. 

A word about QSLing

The final courtesy of the QSO is the QSL, and it isn't finished until the paperwork is done! The good news is that most JT65 users use LoTW.  Many also use eQSL and QRZ.com logbook. This saves the time and expense of sending for QSL cards. With LoTW you can apply toward VUCC, DXCC, WAS and other awards quite easily. With eQSL you can apply for their own eAwards or CQ magazine awards such as WAZ or WPX. QRZ has their own awards system as well. 

And that's it! Now you can make a simple JT65 QSO and work the rare grid squares with low power and a compromise antenna. 

Until next time! CUAGN on my waterfall.

33,
Ria, N2RJ


PS - I'm new here and will be writing from time to time. Niece has graciously allowed me to contribute to her blog, so we can have a source of knowledge for YLs (and anyone, really) to enhance their experience in the hobby. My info is on QRZ.com if you'd like to contact me. 



Thursday, July 28, 2016

Grounding, Radials, counterpoises, rods and ribbons, etc


here are the notes from the May 21 presentation

session May 21, 2015 echolink 8 pm Yl NFarl-r





Grounding (RODS and Ribbons)
May 21, 2015 YLRL echolink net

An effective ground system is necessary for every amateur station.
The mission of the ground system is twofold. FIRST, it reduces the possibility of electrical shocks if something in a piece of equipment should fail and the chassis or cabinet become “HOT.” If connected properly, three-wire electrical systems ground the chassis. A ground system to prevent shock hazard is generally referred to as “DC GROUND.”

The second job the ground system must perform is to provide a low-impedance path to ground for any stray RF current inside the station. Stray RF can cause equipment to malfunction and contributes to RFI problems. This low-impedance path is usually called “RF GROUND.”

The first step in building a ground system is to bound together the chassis of all equipment in your station. Ordinary hookup wire will do for a dc ground, but for a good RF ground you need a low-impedance conductor, COPPER STRAP sold as 'flashing copper,” is excellent for this application, it maybe hard to find. Braid for coaxial cable is popular choice; it is readily available, makes a low-impedance conductor, and is flexible. You see this on roofs in south and west.

Grounding straps can be run from equipment chassis to equipment chassis.1/2 copper water pipe runs entire length of operating bench. A thick braid from RG-8 cable runs from each piece of equipment to a clamp on the pipe.

After equipment is bonded to common ground bus the ground bus must be wired to a good earth ground. This run should be with heavy conductor (braid – I CALL RIBBON) should be short and direct as possible.

Drive one or more grounds rods into earth where conductor leaves the house. Ground rods-8 to 10 feet can be acquired from electrical supply house (home depot or lowe's or the like) steel with heavy copper plating.

Once rod is in ground clamp the conductor from the station ground bus to it with a clamp that can be tightened securely and will NOT RUST. Copper-plated clamps made specifically for this purpose can be found and electrical supply stores. If possible solder the connection.

ANOTHER popular station ground is the COLD (not hot) water pipe system in the building.
Length of of ground wire should be multiple of ¼ wave.

Ground noise:
Noise in ground systems can affect sensitive radio equipment. It is usually related to one of three problems:
1. Insufficient ground conductor wire
2. Loose ground connections or
3. Ground loops

liberal use lock washer and star washers is highly recommended
Ground noise can affect receive and transmitted signals

The antennas that we mount are affected by the presence of ground. At times, the ground is a reflector and at other times, it is an absorber.
The ground around the base of a quarter wave vertical antenna needs considerable help in the form of radials, if this type of antenna is to perform well.
When an antenna that is a near ground radiates, some of the energy will strike the ground and some of the energy will be reflected. The reflected energy will bounce back to the antenna and effect the pattern of current distribution in the radiator, and thus effect the pattern and the feedpoint impedance of the antenna.



After antennas, station grounding is probably the most discussed subject in amateur radio and it is also the one replete with the most misconceptions. The first thing to know is that there are three functions served by grounding in ham shacks: 1. Electrical Safety 2. Stray RF Suppression (or simply RF Grounding) 3. Lightning Protection. Each has it's own set of requirements, but not all station setups need every kind of ground. In fact, some setups don't use a ground at all! The articles on this page will help clear up some of the myths and mystery surrounding this popular topic.

Grounds fulfill three distinct functions. The best ground for one function isn't necessarily the best for another. The three are:
a. Safety ground. This protects you from a shock hazard if one of the mains or high voltage power supply wires contacts the chassis due to some kind of fault. The requirements for this ground are spelled out in your state's electrical code. I believe that most states adopt the National Electrical Code (NEC). The safety ground conductor in your wall sockets should be connected to ground according to this code, and your rig's chassis should be connected to the safety ground.

b. Lightning ground. The requirements for a ground for lightning protection are much more stringent than for a safety ground. The topic has been discussed in this group many times, and there are numerous resources available for learning how to make a ground system for lightning protection. (See the TIS Page on Lightning Protection)

c. RF ground. This is required only for certain types of antennas-- ones which require current flow to ground to complete the antenna circuit. An example is a quarter-wave vertical. One wire of the feedline connects to the base of the antenna, and the other connects to ground. The connection to ground has to have a low RF resistance, or you'll expend too much of your power heating the ground. A few radial wires will provide a moderately low loss connection. A ground rod will help a little, but the RF resistance will be high, resulting in quite a bit of loss. Chapter 8 of the ARRL Antenna Book shows the approximate trade between resistance and number of radials. If your antenna is much shorter than ¼ wavelength, you'll need many, many radials to get reasonable efficiency. If it's longer, you can get by with fewer. A ½ wavelength base-fed vertical needs only a very modest ground, and a ground rod is adequate. The requirements for various other end-fed antennas depend on their length. If you use a "complete" antenna like a dipole or a ground plane (that is, one that doesn't require your feedline to connect to ground), you don't need a RF ground, as long as you keep common-mode currents off your feedline. A "current" or "choke" balun is most commonly used for this.










Radials:

Counterpoises:


Rods:


Besides one lead from inside the shack, the others go to several other well spaced ground rods, a lead to the tower base (which has it's own ground system), and finally, the power company ground, which is only about a foot away.

73
K9WN Jake
picture is taken from k9wn


Youtube video showing how to drive a 10 foot ground rod into the ground with water.
link>

Ribbons:




Is Your Radio Equipment REALLY Grounded?

You may believe your radio equipment, antenna and tower are well-grounded. After all, you drove the ground rods into the earth yourself and connected the ground wire to the rods with heavy-duty clamps.

With an ohmmeter, I measured an open circuit from the ground wire to its grounding clamp! This was true for both the equipment ground outside my radio room and for the ground at the base of my beam antenna.

I do understand that contact points oxidize and their resistance increases. But the ohmmeter's needle didn't move even on the instrument's X 1000 range! I had no grounds that worked!

military handbook on grounding, bonding and shielding: A PDF download



any questions contact KB4GQN or KA1ULN




















Grounding:

what kind of grounding do you have for your station?

Do you know what grounding is used for?

Please add your comments below about YOUR ground installation.


on May 21, at 8:00 EST come hear a understand Antennas part 3
GROUNDING: radials, counterpoises, rods and ribbons
FEATURING: KM4GQN

Hope all of you can make it this week! We’ll be back on Echolink Node 560686 NF4GA-R repeater or locally on 145.47MHz PL100Hz (-) offset. It’s going to be a fun and exciting net! We are looking forward to everyone participating in the fun! Here’s how

thank you

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

SPIRIT OF 76 (7 Days, 6 Modes) QSO PARTY


SPIRIT OF 76 (7 Days, 6 Modes) QSO PARTY
This event will run for 7 days and be around July 4th of each year. Make as many contacts as you can during the week using 6 modes. The modes that will be used are as follows as well as the suggested frequencies to monitor:

1. USB (28.345)

2. RTTY (28.086)

3. CW (28.050)

4. FM (29.600)

5. PSK (28.120)

6. AM (29.000)

Scoring will be as normal for QSO Parties, 2 points for members and 1 point for non-members. Dupes will be allowed once for each mode. It will be possible to work the same call 6 times in each of the various modes for a maximum total of 12 points per call. All other normal rules apply. Logs shall be forwarded to the QSO Party Manager.

KG5BHY YL blog


here is another Blog by a YL


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http://weeklynet.org/ylntx


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