Monday, February 20, 2017

2017 YEAR of the YL Ham Radio Operator

YL:
Here is your chance to shine on the Ham bands.
this is an incentive to get all YL's to push those PTT button's on
ALL Ham radio bands.
if you want to know where YL's hang out try 14.288

When on the band calling CQ please take a minute to specifically
ask for YL's only.

*********************************************************************
All YLs - Please join us on Echolink for YL Ham Echolink Net every
Thursday evening at 8pm Eastern Time (Friday 01:00UTC Winter/Friday 00:00UTC Summer)!
All YLs welcomed to participate (OMs encouraged to listen if you like)!
Look for us on Echolink ALARA Conference Node 286905.
*********************************************************************


mac logging program >> http://www.dl2rum.de/rumsoft/RUMLog.html
log4om robust logging program

to upgrade one option is www.HAMTESTING.com free study guide

everyone is waiting to have a qso with you.

last but not least PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE LOG YOUR QSO'S

OM:
Here is YOUR chance to hear YL's on the ham bands.
YL numbers are growing like a tsunami (not a wave).
They are out there.

when you are calling CQ please take a minute and specifically ask for YL's only -
you will be very surprised when you have a pileup of YL's

Everyone:
when you have contacted one YL in each and every state you will receive
a WAS-Yl certificate. there is only a few who has completed this....
so this is my challenge to you.
if YOU know of a YL who needs help.... help her out or refer her to me KA1ULN@MAIL.COM

if you know of a YL who has let her license expire refer her to me KA1ULN@MAIL.COM

thank you so much for visiting my blog: KA1ULN.BLOGSPOT.COM
log your qso's please

if you want to know where YL's hang out try 14.288

#yearylhamradioop

33/73

BTW: some people do not know what Yl or 33 is
YL = Young Lady (female)
33 = is hello or good-bye for a YL.

I encourge everyone to visit www.YLRL.org

for the WAS-YL certificate here are details: http://ylrl.org/index.php/ylrl-certificates



LOG YOUR QSO'S USE QRZ.COM VERY EASY TO USE... check blog: for directions.
or lotw, or eQSL.cc there are may good loggers. BUT just LOG as you were taught
when studying for your license

KA1ULN.BLOGSPOT.COM

if you want to know where YL's hang out try 14.288







Friday, February 10, 2017

February ham radio - NOVICE Rig Roundup

2017 YEAR OF THE YL HAM RADIO OPERATOR
****************************************************************************************
Novice Rig Roundup: 0000Z, Feb 18 to 2400Z, Feb 26
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 15, 10, 2m
Classes: General
Novice
QRP
Max power: General: >60 watts
Novice: 60 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: RST + Name + QTH + Rig + (Xtal/VFO) + Power
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Bonus Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: Each state, province and country
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + bonus points
Submit logs by: March 31, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://NoviceRigRoundup.com/logs.htm
Mail logs to: Brian Carling, AF4K
117 Sterling Pine Street
Sanford, FL 32773
USA
Find rules at: http://novicerigroundup.com/
****************************************************************************************

SKCC Sprint: 0000Z-0200Z, Feb 22
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: (none)
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + Name + (SKCC No./power)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Bonus Points: 5 points per Centurion member QSO per band
Bonus Points: 10 points per Tribune member QSO per band
Bonus Points: 25 points per QSO with SKCC club call (K9SKC) per band
Multipliers: Each state, province, or country once
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + bonus points
Submit logs by: 2359Z February 24, 2017
E-mail log summary to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.skccgroup.com/operating_activities/weekday_sprint/submit-display.php
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.skccgroup.com/operating_activities/weekday_sprint/
****************************************************************************************

NAQCC CW Sprint: 0130Z-0330Z, Feb 22
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 20m
Classes: (none)
Max power: 5 watts
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + (NAQCC No./power)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO with non-member
2 points per QSO with member
Multipliers: Each state, province, or country once
Key Type Mult: 2x if straight key, 1.5x if bug, 1x if other
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults x key type mult
Submit logs by: 2359Z February 26, 2017
E-mail logs to: naqcc33[at]windstream[dot]net
Upload log at: http://naqcc.info/sprintlog.html
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://naqcc.info/sprint/sprint201702.html
****************************************************************************************

QRP Fox Hunt: 0200Z-0330Z, Feb 22
Mode: CW
Bands: 40m Only
Classes: Single Op (Fox/Hound)
Max power: 5 watts
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: 0330Z February 23, 2017
E-mail logs to: (see rules)
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.qrpfoxhunt.org/winter_rules.htm
****************************************************************************************

Phone Fray: 0230Z-0300Z, Feb 22
Mode: SSB
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15m
Classes: Single Op
Max power: 100 watts
Exchange: NA: Name + (state/province/country)
non-NA: Name
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: NA station: 1 point per QSO
non-NA station: 1 point per QSO with an NA station
Multipliers: Each US state (including KH6/KL7) once per band
Each VE province/territory once per band
Each North American country (except W/VE) once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 0300Z February 24, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.perluma.com/Phone_Fray_Contest_Rules.pdf
****************************************************************************************

CWops Mini-CWT Test: 1300Z-1400Z, Feb 22 and 1900Z-2000Z, Feb 22 and 0300Z-0400Z, Feb 23
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: Member: Name + Member No.
non-Member: Name + (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: Each call once
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 0400Z February 25, 2017
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.cwops.org/cwt.html
****************************************************************************************

UKEICC 80m Contest: 2000Z-2100Z, Feb 22
Mode: CW
Bands: 80m Only
Classes: Single Op Connected (High/Low/QRP)
Single Op Unconnected (High/Low/QRP)
Max power: HP: 1500 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: 4-Character grid square
QSO Points: 1 point per 500 km
multiply QSO points by 2 if low power station
multiply QSO points by 4 if QRP station
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: 2200Z February 22, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://logs.ukeicc.com/cgi-bin/hfenter.pl
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ukeicc.com/which-contest/which-contest-ukeicc-80m-contests-rules
****************************************************************************************

RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW: 2000Z-2130Z, Feb 23
Mode: CW
Bands: 80m Only
Classes: (none)
Exchange: RST + Serial No.
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: (see rules)
Submit logs by: 2359Z February 24, 2017
Upload log at: http://www.rsgbcc.org/cgi-bin/hfenter.pl
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.rsgbcc.org/hf/rules/2017/r80mcc.shtml
****************************************************************************************

NCCC RTTY Sprint: 0145Z-0215Z, Feb 24
Mode: RTTY
Bands: (see rules)
Classes: (none)
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: February 26, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rttyns.html

QRP Fox Hunt: 0200Z-0330Z, Feb 24
Mode: CW
Bands: 80m Only
Classes: Single Op (Fox/Hound)
Max power: 5 watts
Exchange: RST + (state/province/country) + name + power output
QSO Points: 1 point per QSO
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: 0330Z February 25, 2017
E-mail logs to: (see rules)
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.qrpfoxhunt.org/winter_rules.htm
****************************************************************************************

NCCC Sprint Ladder: 0230Z-0300Z, Feb 24
Mode: CW
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Single Op
Max power: 100 watts
Exchange: Serial No. + Name + QTH
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: NA station: 1 point per QSO
non-NA station: 1 point per QSO with an NA station
Multipliers: Each US state (including KL7 and KH6) once per band
Each VE province once per band
Each North American country (except W/VE) once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: February 26, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Post log summary at: http://www.3830scores.com
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.ncccsprint.com/rules.html
****************************************************************************************

CQ 160-Meter Contest, SSB: 2200Z, Feb 24 to 2200Z, Feb 26
Mode: SSB
Bands: 160m Only
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Assisted (High)
Multi-Op (High)
Max operating hours: Single Op: 30 hours
Multi-Op: 40 hours
Max power: HP: >150 watts
LP: 150 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: W/VE: RS + (state/province)
DX: RS + CQ Zone
QSO Points: 2 points per QSO with own country
5 points per QSO with other countries on same continent
10 points per QSO with other continents
5 points per QSO with maritime mobile
Multipliers: Each US state + DC (excluding KH6/KL7)
Each VE province
Each DXCC+WAE country (including KH6/KL7)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 2200Z March 2, 2017
E-mail logs to: 160ssb[at]cq160[dot]com
Mail logs to: CQ 160 Meter Contest
17 West John St.
Hicksville, NY 11801
USA
Find rules at: http://www.cq160.com/rules.htm
****************************************************************************************

REF Contest, SSB: 0600Z, Feb 25 to 1800Z, Feb 26
Mode: SSB
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (QRP/Low/High)
Single Op Single Band (QRP/Low/High)
Multi-Single (QRP/Low/High)
Club
SWL
Max operating hours: Single Op: 28 hours in no more than 3 increments of at least 1 hour each
Max power: HP: >100 Watts
LP: 100 Watts
QRP: 5 Watts
Exchange: French: RS + Department/Prefix
non-French: RS + Serial No.
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: French: 6 points per QSO with French station same continent
French: 15 points per QSO with French station on different continent
French: 1 point per QSO with non-French station same continent
French: 2 points per QSO with non-French station on different continent
non-French: 1 point per QSO with French station same continent
non-French: 3 points per QSO with French station on different continent
Multipliers: French/Corsica departments once per band
French overseas prefixes once per band
non-French DXCC countries once per band (available only to French stations)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: March 13, 2017
E-mail logs to: cdfssb[at]ref-union[dot]org
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://concours.ref-union.org/reglements/actuels/reg_cdfhf_dx.pdf
****************************************************************************************

UBA DX Contest, CW: 1300Z, Feb 25 to 1300Z, Feb 26
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op All Band (Low/High)
Single Op Single Band (Low/High)
Single Op QRP
Multi-Op
SWL
Max power: HP: >100 watts
LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: ON: RST + Serial No. + province
non-ON: RST + Serial No.
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: 10 points per QSO with Belgian station
3 points per QSO with other EU stations
1 point per QSO with non-EU stations
Multipliers: Each Belgian province once per band
Each Belgian prefix once per band
Each EU DXCC country once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 2359Z March 12, 2017
E-mail logs to: ubacw[at]uba[dot]be
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.uba.be/en/hf/contest-rules/uba-dx-contest-rules
****************************************************************************************

South Carolina QSO Party: 1500Z, Feb 25 to 0159Z, Feb 26
Mode: CW, Digital, Phone
Bands: 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6m
Classes: Single Op Fixed (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
Multi-Single Fixed (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
Multi-Multi Fixed (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
Mobile-Single (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
Mobile-Multi (CW/SSB/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
Max power: HP: >100W
LP: 100W
QRP: 5W
Exchange: SC: RS(T) + County
non-SC: RS(T) + (state/province/"DX")
Work stations: Once per band per mode per county
QSO Points: 1 point per phone QSO
2 points per CW or Digital QSO
SC stations contacting non-SC stations earn double QSO points
Bonus: 250 points per QSO with W4CAE, WW4SF
Multipliers: SC: Each SC county, US state (including DC) and VE province/territory once per mode
non-SC: Each SC county once per mode
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + Bonus Points
Submit logs by: March 27, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://scqso.com/log-submission/
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://scqso.com/rules/
****************************************************************************************

North American QSO Party, RTTY: 1800Z, Feb 25 to 0559Z, Feb 26
Mode: RTTY
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: Single Op (QRP/Low)
Multi-Two (Low)
Max operating hours: Single Op: 10 hours
Multi-Two: 12 hours
Max power: LP: 100 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: NA: Name + (state/DC/province/country)
non-NA: Name
Work stations: Once per band
QSO Points: NA station: 1 point per QSO
non-NA station: 1 point per QSO with an NA station
Multipliers: Each US state/DC (including KH6/KL7) once per band
Each VE province/territory once per band
Each North American country (except W/VE) once per band
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: 0559Z March 3, 2017
Upload log at: http://www.ncjweb.com/naqplogsubmit/
Mail logs to: Mark Aaker, K6UFO
300 Berry St., Unit 1009
San Francisco, CA 94158-1668
USA
Find rules at: http://www.ncjweb.com/NAQP-Rules.pdf
****************************************************************************************

High Speed Club CW Contest: 0900Z-1100Z, Feb 26 and 1500Z-1700Z, Feb 26
Mode: CW
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10m
Classes: HSC Members
Non-Members
QRP
SWL
Max power: 150 watts
QRP: 5 watts
Exchange: Members: RST + HSC No.
non-Members: RST + "NM"
Work stations: Once per band per period
QSO Points: 5 points per QSO with a HSC member
1 points per QSO with a non-member
Multipliers: (none)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points
Submit logs by: March 18, 2017
E-mail logs to: joe[at]dl4cf[dot]com
Mail logs to: Joe Vollbrecht, DL4CF
HSC Contest Manager
Steingasse 3
D-06642 Nebra
Germany
Find rules at: http://www.highspeedclub.org/
****************************************************************************************

SARL Digital Contest: 1300Z-1600Z, Feb 26
Mode: PSK, RTTY
Bands: 80, 40, 20m
Classes: (none)
Exchange: RST + QSO No.
Work stations: Once per mode per band
QSO Points: (see rules)
Multipliers: (see rules)
Score Calculation: Total score = total QSO points x total mults
Submit logs by: March 5, 2017
E-mail logs to: contest[at]sarl[dot]org[dot]za
Mail logs to: (none)
Find rules at: http://www.sarl.org.za/Web3/Members/DoDocDownload.aspx?X=20161222085537waqSliCvbT.PDF
****************************************************************************************

North Carolina QSO Party: 1500Z, Feb 26 to 0059Z, Feb 27
Mode: CW, Phone, Digital
Bands: 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, 2m
Classes: Single Op (NC/non-NC)(CW/Phone/Digital/Mixed)(QRP/Low/High)
NC Mobile Mixed
NC Mobile Lone Ranger Mixed
NC Club Mixed (Low/High)
NC Club Phone
NC County Expedition Mixed
NC County Expedition Mixed QRP
Max power: HP: >150 watts
LP: 150 watts
QRP: 5 watts CW or dig/10 watts phone
Exchange: NC: County
non-NC: (state/province/country)
Work stations: Once per band per mode
QSO Points: 2 points per phone QSO
3 points per CW QSO
3 points per digital QSO
Bonus Points: 50 points for at least one QSO with Swain county
Bonus Points: 50 points for at least one QSO with Warren county
Bonus Points: 50 points for at least one QSO with NI4BK
Bonus Points: 50 points for at least one QSO with W4DW
Bonus Points: 50 points for at least one QSO with W1VOA
Bonus Points: 200 points if all 5 other bonus points worked
Bonus Points for NC Mobiles/Expeditions: 100 points for each county activated
Multipliers: NC stations: Each NC county, state, province, and one DXCC country once
Non-NC stations: Each NC county once
Score Calculation: Total score = (total QSO points x total mults) + bonus points
Submit logs by: March 20, 2017
E-mail logs to: (none)
Upload log at: http://rars.org/ncqsoparty/index.php?id=logs
Mail logs to: NC QSO Party
c/o Charles Swindell
10809 Rondeau Woods Ct.
Raleigh, NC 27614
USA
Find rules at: http://rars.org/ncqsoparty/index.php?id=rules

****************************************************************************************

thanx to wa7bnm









Friday, November 25, 2016

YL CHALLENGE


I challenge anyone (especially YL's) to have one qso with a YL from every state WAS-YL?

here are the details

http://ylrl.org/index.php/ylrl-certificates

YLRLs Have Wonderful Certificates
For questions, information and submission on the following certificates:
Worked All States YL (WAS-YL) Worked All Continents YL (WAC-YL) YL Century Club (YLCC) DX YL YL-DXCC YL-Digital Modes
Contact the YLRL Certificate Manager:
Val Lemko VE5AQ
1125 Iroquois St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask. Canada S6H 5C1
ve5aq@sasktel.net



Worked All States YL (WAS-YL)
1. Available to any licensed Amateur in the world.
2. Contact must be made with a duly licensed YL in each of the 50 states in the U.S.
3. The District of Columbia may be counted for Maryland.
4. There are no time or band limitations.
5. In qualifying for this certificate, it is possible to work the SAME YL in each of the 50 states.
6. The list of contacts must be arranged alphabetically



Worked All Continents YL (WAC-YL)
1. Available to any licensed Amateur in the world.
2. Two-way communications must be established on the amateur radio bands with YLs on the six
continents: North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania (which includes Australia and New Zealand).
3. Any and all authorized Amateur Radio bands may be used.
4. Cross-band contacts are permitted.
5. Contacts may have been made over any period of time.
6. Contacts with all six continents must be made with duly licensed women operators.
7. It is not necessary for each contact to be a different YL.
8. Submit a list of claimed contacts alphabetically arranged by continent.



YL Century Club (YLCC)
1. Available to any licensed Amateur in the world.
2. Two-way communications must be established on authorized Amateur bands, with stations, mobile or fixed, operated by 100 different licensed women Amateurs.
3. The same YL using different call letters will NOT count.
4. Any and all amateur bands may be used.
5. Contacts with YLs anywhere in the world are recognized, provided that confirmations clearly indicate the stations were operated by duly licensed women Amateur Radio operators.
6. List of claimed contacts must be arranged alphabetically by call sign.
7. Endorsements: Confirmations of contacts accompanied by an alphabetical list, as described above, from stations operated by additional YLs may be submitted for credit each time 50 additional confirmations are available. Endorsements will be made to the original certificate when application is approved.
8. Gold stickers will be awarded to applicants who have worked their additional contacts from the same country; otherwise, silver stickers will be awarded. Please indicate whether you are applying for a gold or silver sticker when submitting your application.



DX YL
1. Available to licensed YL operators only, for working 25 DIFFERENT licensed women operators outside your own country, on or after April 1, 1958.
2. USA and possessions are counted as separate countries, as well as Alaska and Hawaii.
3. Any and all amateur bands may be used.
4. Contacts do not have to be with 25 different countries, just 25 different DX YLs.
5. The log must be arranged alphabetically by call sign.
6. Endorsements: Stickers will be awarded for each 10 additional DX YLs, subject to the same confirmation as above.



YL-DXCCL
1. Available to any licensed Amateur in the world.
2. Two-way communications must be established on authorized Amateur bands with stations (fixed or mobile), operated by licensed YLs from 100 countries on the current ARRL list of countries.
3. Any band or mode (except cross-band contacts) maybe used.
4. The log must be arranged alphabetically by country.
5. Endorsements: After receiving the certificate, a silver sticker will be awarded for contacts with YLs in 25 additional DX countries. List requirements are the same as for the original application.



YL-Digital Mode
1. Available to any licensed Amateur in the world.
2. Two-way communications must be established on authorized Amateur bands with stations (fixed or mobile), operated by licensed YLs using digital modes only.
3. Contact must be made with 25 YLs using a digital mode (PSK31, RTTY, CW, SSTV, etc.) All contacts must be made using the same mode.
4. The log must be arranged alphabetically by call sign.
5. Endorsements: After receiving the first certificate, a sticker may be awarded for each additional digital mode in which 25 YL contacts are made. (i.e. If the first 25 contacts were made using PSK31, an endorsement may be earned for making 25 contacts with YLs using RTTY. An additional endorsement after that may be earned for CW contacts, SSTV contacts, or Hellschreiber contacts, etc.)



Continuous Membership Certificate
This certificate is available ONLY to YLRL members. It is awarded automatically to any YL who has been a member, continuously for five years. Diamond-shaped stickers are awarded for each additional five years of continuous membership.
For questions, information on the Continuous Membership Certificate, please contact the current Continuous Membership Chair:
Lois Gutshall WB3EFQ
wb3efq@verizon.net


Basic Rules Applicable To All YLRL Certificates
1. Contacts made through repeater devices or any other power relay method cannot be used for any YLRL certificate confirmation.
2. All contacts must be made FROM the same country.
3. Mail or e-mail your list of contacts only. DO NOT SEND QSL CARDS TO THE Manager! Two (2) other Amateurs must sign the list of contacts verifying that the QSL cards are in the possession of the applicant. In the case of lists submitted by e-mail, the name, callsign, and email address of two Amateurs who verified the list must be submitted with the list (signatures are not required).
4. No charge is made for certificates sent out by e-mail attachment. However, if the applicant would like a printed certificate mailed to them, they MUST send sufficient postage for first class mail or a stamped self-addressed legal-size envelope to cover the cost of mailing the certificate.
5. All certificate applications must include the date, time, callsign, YLs first name, QTH, mode, band, RST given, and RST received. Additional information may be listed in each certificate's rules, as well as the order for the contacts.
6. All inquiries should be addressed to the certificate manager.
7. Decisions of the manager regarding interpretations of the rules as here stated or later amended shall be final.
8. The certificate manager's address and e-mail address is listed in each issue of the YL Harmonics.
9. Each application must include ONLY the amount of contacts needed to receive the certificate or seal. No list containing less than the required contacts will be accepted, and any extra contacts listed will be discarded, but can be resubmitted as part of the correct number of contacts for an endorsement.
10. Each certificate may be applied for by e-mail or postal mail to the certificate manager.
11. E-mail applicants will receive their certificates as an attachment to an e-mail. The certificate will be sent in .pdf format and can be viewed and printed out using the free Adobe Reader program available for download from http://www.adobe.com
12. Endorsement stickers must be applied for by mail only.


good luck

ka1uln

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math: Education for Global Leadership >>> Amateur Radio YL's



“[Science]“[Science] is more than a school subject, or the periodic table, or the properties of waves. It is an approach to the world, a critical way to understand and explore and engage with the world, and then have the capacity to change that world..."

— President Barack Obama, March 23, 2015

The United States has developed as a global leader, in large part, through the genius and hard work of its scientists, engineers, and innovators. In a world that’s becoming increasingly complex, where success is driven not only by what you know, but by what you can do with what you know, it’s more important than ever for our youth to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to solve tough problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information. These are the types of skills that students learn by studying science, technology, engineering, and math—subjects collectively known as STEM.

Yet today, few American students pursue expertise in STEM fields—and we have an inadequate pipeline of teachers skilled in those subjects. That’s why President Obama has set a priority of increasing the number of students and teachers who are proficient in these vital fields.

Projected Percentage Increases In STEM Jobs from 2010 to 2020: 14% for all occupations, 16% for Mathematics, 22% for Computer Systems Analysts, 32% for Systems Software Developers, 36% for Medical Scientists, 62% for Biomedical Engineers
The need

All young people should be prepared to think deeply and to think well so that they have the chance to become the innovators, educators, researchers, and leaders who can solve the most pressing challenges facing our nation and our world, both today and tomorrow. But, right now, not enough of our youth have access to quality STEM learning opportunities and too few students see these disciplines as springboards for their careers.expand/collapse

The goals

President Obama has articulated a clear priority for STEM education: within a decade, American students must "move from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math." The Obama Administration also is working toward the goal of fairness between places, where an equitable distribution of quality STEM learning opportunities and talented teachers can ensure that all students have the chance to study and be inspired by science, technology, engineering, and math—and have the chance to reach their full potential.expand/collapse

The plan

The Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM), comprised of 13 agencies—including all of the mission-science agencies and the Department of Education—are facilitating a cohesive national strategy, with new and repurposed funds, to increase the impact of federal investments in five areas: 1.) improving STEM instruction in preschool through 12th grade; 2.) increasing and sustaining public and youth engagement with STEM; 3.) improving the STEM experience for undergraduate students; 4.) better serving groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields; and 5.) designing graduate education for tomorrow's STEM workforce.expand/collapse

Supporting Teachers and Students in STEM

At the Department of Education, we share the President’s commitment to supporting and improving STEM education. Ensuring that all students have access to high-quality learning opportunities in STEM subjects is a priority, demonstrated by the fact that dozens of federal programs have made teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering, and math a critical component of competitiveness for grant funding. Just this year, for the very first time, the Department announced that its Ready-to-Learn Television grant competition would include a priority to promote the development of television and digital media focused on science.

The Department’s Race to the Top-District program supports educators in providing students with more personalized learning—in which the pace of and approach to instruction are uniquely tailored to meet students’ individual needs and interests—often supported by innovative technologies. STEM teachers across the country also are receiving resources, support, training, and development through programs like Investing in Innovation (i3), the Teacher Incentive Fund, the Math and Science Partnerships program, Teachers for a Competitive Tomorrow, and the Teacher Quality Partnerships program.

Because we know that learning happens everywhere—both inside and outside of formal school settings—the Department’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers program is collaborating with NASA, the National Park Service, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services to bring high-quality STEM content and experiences to students from low-income, high-need schools. This initiative has made a commitment to Native-American students, providing about 350 young people at 11 sites across six states with out-of-school STEM courses focused on science and the environment.

And in higher education, the Hispanic-Serving Institutions-STEM program is helping to increase the number of Hispanic students attaining degrees in STEM subjects.

This sampling of programs represents some of the ways in which federal resources are helping to assist educators in implementing effective approaches for improving STEM teaching and learning; facilitating the dissemination and adoption of effective STEM instructional practices nationwide; and promoting STEM education experiences that prioritize hands-on learning to increase student engagement and achievement.




WOMEN and STEM>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/women



Learn more

Five-Year Strategic Plan for STEM Education [PDF]
STEM Programs at ED
Green Strides Program
Women in STEM
2015 White House Science Fair
President Obama’s Remarks
Educate to Innovate
Civil Rights Data Collection
College- and Career-Ready/ STEM Access Snapshot [PDF]

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

beverage antennas


here is some more information on beverage antennas w8ji thanx

beverage antennas link


My History With Beverages

I originally began experimenting with long, low, wire antennas in the 1960's. Even though I had a working mostly homebrew station, I now realize I had only a small idea what I was doing, and almost no understanding of what made antennas work.

My entry into Ham radio was from modified broadcast radios, and the very active 160-meter mobile group in Toledo, Ohio. I always thought the longer the antenna, the better the "pickup". was fascinated by the distant AM broadcast, lower shortwave, and 160-meter signals heard with long antennas. My early antennas were nothing more than hundreds or thousands of feet of very thin magnet wire, strung over tree limbs and along telephone poles (which had steel climbing pegs), all through a typical crowded 1950's suburban neighborhood. Unfortunately my early experiments were hampered by lack of room. Thin magnet wire, unwound from early-radio speaker field magnets, strung in the middle of the night through a crowded suburban neighborhood across neighbor's small lots, doesn't stay up long.

In the early 1970's, I moved to a house with several acres of woods. The soil was a very wet, sandy, black loam. A neighbor just north of me, W8FPU (Parker) was actually working a couple of VK's on 160-meters, something very rare at the time. Using information from a series of engineering lectures by John "Jack" Kuecken (now SK) and correspondence with Stew W1BB, I installed my first "real" Beverage antenna. I was delighted to find a large improvement in weak-signal reception from very simple, inexpensive, easy-to-install wire antennas. Eventually, that system evolved from a few long single wires to a two-wire reversible system. The two-wire system used two Beverages, oriented 90 degrees from each other. This gave four direction coverage. That system, with the addition of an in-phase and out-of-phase combiner, evolved into a forced-null system using just two reversible antennas. This was before binocular cores were available, and ferrite beads were just appearing. At the early date, I used a series of 73-mix beads to make my transformers, even publishing a few articles in small newsletters.

I continued to improve or refine my Beverage antennas over the years. Virtually all of my Beverage antennas now are arrays of multiple Beverages, not just single wires. While my large circle arrays of verticals, or broadside endfire arrays of verticals, are about even with two long phased Beverages, the Beverage arrays are simpler systems. Arrays of broadside Beverages remain my primary DX receiving antennas for the lowest bands. There isn't any other receiving antenna that is as simple, as easy to construct and maintain, and as foolproof as a Beverage! The only significant Beverage disadvantage is the long physical length required, and maintenance of a very long antenna. If we want significant directivity, Beverages (like all long wire arrays) require a great deal of space .

Testing and Comparing Antennas

I work a little different than many or most people when experimenting, always A-B testing and comparing antennas over time. This is partly because a newer, bigger, or better looking antenna always feels better. Even before something is used, especially if the "something new" involved effort or expense, we can "like" it and become emotionally invested in it. We want something new to work better, so we look for everything "good".

I credit a 7th and 8th grade science teacher for educating students about this phenomena. Early in school, a science teacher at Olney middle school in Northwood, Ohio demonstrated how easily and often false conclusions are reached, based on feelings about results or past performance memory. One year of science with Mr. Kohler, when I was 12 or 13 years old, changed how I look at many things in life. Because of Mr. Kohler, I almost always retain a reference or control, try to use direct measurements of what I actually want to know, and use multiple methods when possible. Mr. Kohler demonstrated how easy it was to reach false conclusions, unless we use valid measurements.

Most antenna myths and misconceptions, many making it into print in articles, come from repeating feelings or unsubstantiated claims, or are based on improper measurements or models. I've seen comparisons years apart, going on memory of how signals were on some other antenna that was long gone!

I presently have a great deal of room, with wiring in place to install multiple antennas, and reasonably good test equipment. This allows installation of multiple antenna systems at the same time, which allows direct comparisons over time, as well as measurements. I constantly refine antenna systems by comparing systems against each other for extended periods of time, usually more than a year.

there are more pictures and documents please go to link above



Bent Dipoles


here is some great information on dipoles thanx to KK4obi

Bent Dipoles link

there is more if you click on the link


This web site is devoted primarily as a resource for amateur radio operators
to see what happens if they bend a half-wave dipole.

The performance of a dipole is highest when it is not bent. When a half-wave or full-wave dipole is bent: the gain goes down; the resonant length gets shorter; the frequency goes higher; the impedance decreases. Only when the length is three or more half-wavelengths can bending increase gain as you transition into gull-wing, half-rhombic V and rhombic antennas.

To help understand what happens to a bent dipole, you will see graphs showing the changes in Gain, Resonant Length, SWR, etc. as well as polar charts of far field radiation patterns and 3D flyover views as a bend point is moved or angle of bend changes.

1. We start with bending the ends of an ordinary center-fed dipole limited by an attic, garden, wall, etc. or to reduce turning radius. We than look at bending a dipole in the middle... up and down, side to side... to form V or L-type configurations.
See illustrations of all eleven studies at: Center-fed Dipoles.

2. The second phase looks the same set of configurations but by feeding a dipole off-center, (OCF). This an outgrowth of antenna/coax matching because of the low impedance of dipoles in the V or L-form, not for multi-band application. However, as part of this, there is a study related to feed points up to the 6th harmonic.

3. The third phase deals with slow wave antennas for size reduction- primarily for cell phones, routers, printers, remote control, as well as radio frequency identification (RFID) for merchandise or toll/parking collection- but applied to amateur radio antennas. These studies include meander, zig-zag and catenary curve methods.

4. The information presented is derived from a mixture of practical antenna prototyping and wire antenna modeling used to find out what is going on and "what happens if...". The software used is 4NEC2, a Windows compatible program based on an NEC-2/ NEC-4 core (Numeric Electromagnetics Code). It is used to create, view and check antenna designs and generate displays of radiation patterns. Of particular importance for the studies reported here is its optimizer function which automatically adjusts antenna variables to find the best Gain, Resonance, Standing Wave Ratio (SWR), Efficiency, Front-to-Back ratio or combination thereof. Its sweep function then graphs Far Field Radiation Pattern and 3D view plus Reflection Coefficient, Reactance, Impedance and Phase over the range of frequencies of interest.